carbon

(redirected from carbon paper)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to carbon paper: Carbonless paper

carbon

 (C) [kahr´bon]
a chemical element, atomic number 6, atomic weight 12.011. (See Appendix 6.)
carbon 11 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 11, having a half-life of 20.39 minutes; used as a tracer in positron emission tomography.
carbon 14 a radioactive isotope of carbon, atomic mass 14, having a half-life of 5730 years; used as a tracer in cancer and metabolic research.

car·bon (C),

(kar'bŏn),
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in three pure forms (diamond, graphite, and in the fullerines), in amorphous form (in charcoal, coke, and soot), and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

/car·bon/ (C) (kahr´bon) a chemical element, at. no. 6.
carbon dioxide  an odorless, colorless gas, CO2, resulting from oxidation of carbon, and formed in the tissues and eliminated by the lungs; used in some pump oxygenators to maintain blood carbon dioxide tension. In solid form it is carbon dioxide snow (see under snow ).
carbon monoxide  an odorless gas, CO, formed by burning carbon or organic fuels with a scanty supply of oxygen; inhalation causes central nervous system damage and asphyxiation by combining irreversibly with blood hemoglobin.
carbon tetrachloride  a clear, colorless, volatile liquid; inhalation of its vapors can depress central nervous system activity and cause degeneration of the liver and kidneys.

carbon

(kär′bən)
n.
1. Symbol C An abundant nonmetallic element that occurs in many inorganic and in all organic compounds, exists freely in amorphous, graphite, and diamond forms and as a constituent of coal, limestone, and petroleum, and is capable of chemical self-bonding to form an enormous number of chemically, biologically, and commercially important molecules. Other significant allotropes include fullerenes and nanotubes. Atomic number 6; atomic weight 12.011; sublimation point 3,825°C; triple point 4,489°C; specific gravity of amorphous carbon 1.8 to 2.1, of diamond 3.15 to 3.53, of graphite 1.9 to 2.3; valence 2, 3, 4. See Periodic Table.
2. A carbon-containing gas, notably carbon dioxide, or a collection of such gases, especially when considered as a contributor to the greenhouse effect: plans for capturing and sequestering carbon produced by power plants.
3.
a. A sheet of carbon paper.
b. A carbon copy.
4. Electricity
a. Either of two rods through which current flows to form an arc, as in lighting or welding.
b. A carbonaceous electrode in an electric cell.

car′bon·ous (-bə-nəs) adj.

carbon (C)

[kärbən]
Etymology: L, carbo, coal
a nonmetallic, almost always tetravalent element. Its atomic number is 6; its atomic mass is 12.011. Carbon occurs in pure form in diamonds, graphite, and fullerenes and is a component of all living tissue. The study of organic chemistry focuses on the vast number of carbon compounds. Carbon occurs in impure form in charcoal, coke, and soot, and in the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Carbon is essential to the chemical mechanisms of the body, participating in many metabolic processes and acting as a component of carbohydrates, amino acids, triglycerides, deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids, and many other compounds. See also carbon-11, carbon-14.

carbon

Chemistry
A nonmetallic tetravalent element (atomic number, 6; atomic weight, 12.01), which is central to all forms of life, and a core constituent of organic molecules.
 
Materials science
Because of its chemical properties, carbon has potential for use with silicon as a low-activation structural material for fusion reactors, as silicon carbide.

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
A nonmetallic tetravalent element, atomic no. 6, atomic wt. 12.011; the major bioelement. It has two natural isotopes, 12C and 13C (the former, set at 12.00000, being the standard for all molecular weights), and two artificial, radioactive isotopes of interest, 11C and 14C. The element occurs in diamond, graphite, charcoal, coke, and soot, and in the atmosphere as CO2. Its compounds are found in all living tissues, and the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon

The non-metallic element on which all organic chemistry is based and which is thus present in all organic matter. A carbon atom is capable of combining with up to four other atoms (tetravalent), including other carbon atoms; it is this property that allows so many compounds to be formed.

carbon

the element which is the basis of organic structure. Carbon has a valency of four, each atom forming four covalent bonds in its compounds. Long chains may be formed which give rise to the complexity of many organic compounds.

carbon

a non-metallic element (C) forming compounds that occur in all living tissues; carbon, liberated by metabolic reactions, unites with oxygen (during tissue respiration) forming carbon dioxide (CO2)

car·bon

(C) (kahr'bŏn)
Nonmetallic tetravalent element found in all living tissues; the study of its vast number of compounds constitutes most of organic chemistry.
[L. carbo, coal]

carbon,

n a nonmetallic tetravalent element that occurs in pure form in diamonds and graphite. It occurs as a component of all living tissue. Most of the study of organic chemistry focuses on the vast number of carbon compounds.
carbon coated,
adj a vitreous carbon coating applied to either an endosteal or blade implant to improve tissue compatability.
carbon dioxide,
n a colorless, odorless gas produced by the complete oxidation of carbon. It is a product of cell respiration and is carried by the blood to the lungs and exhaled. The acid-base balance of body fluids and tissues is affected by the level of it and its carbonate compounds.
carbon monoxide,
n a colorless, odorless, poisonous gas produced by the combustion of carbon or organic fuels in a limited oxygen supply. It combines irreversibly with hemoglobin, preventing the formation of oxyhemoglobin and reducing the oxygen supply to the tissues.

carbon

a chemical element, atomic number 6,atomic weight 12.011, symbol C. See Table 6.

asymmetric carbon atom
one bonded to four different atoms. See also isomer.
carbon fiber
made by the pyrolization of polymer fibers at very high temperatures and used in various forms as soft tissue implants, particularly in tendon and ligament repair.
carbon fixation
see dark reaction.

Patient discussion about carbon

Q. hi my name is ray i am from england and i am on oxygen i am a retainer of carbon monxide do you guys know whoa any place working with stem cell or natural medical emial rsantolla@aol.co.uk

A. i had a whole course on stem cell use in tissue engineering and from what i know this is an area that still in research and very little clinical use. the ability to create lungs from Mesenchimal Stem Cells is a far away dream right now. but here are some links to labs that research that area:
http://organizedwisdom.com/Stem_Cells_for_Emphysema

More discussions about carbon
References in periodicals archive ?
A metal stylus was used by the writer to write on a sheet of paper thin enough to be transparent, and using one of these carbon papers the copy actually became the original and the copy that was kept was the thin transparent sheet.
Customs official John Whiting, said: "Mr Lopez has discovered the hard way carbon paper doesn't provide a cloak of invisibility from detection.
After that, I demonstrated how to place a piece of carbon paper dark-side down onto the painted paper from last week, place the photograph on top of that, and trace just the outline of their pose.
Select the best one and use carbon paper to transfer it to cardboard.
I'm typing official government correspondence, by candlelight, on an abandoned, antiquated typewriter, using wrinkled stationery and used carbon paper.
Next, transfer image (or part of it) onto fabric (or fabrics) with carbon paper, then cut out fabric and same-size pieces of interfacing.
This report analyzes the US market for Carbon Paper and Inked Ribbons in US$ Million.
But many establishments ditched the old-style payment system, which relied on carbon paper, with the introduction of chip and pin.
The third part concentrated on transferring the drawn images to the watercolor background using carbon paper as a simple printmaking transfer technique.
Using the carbon paper beneath the tracing paper, students then transferred the basic shapes to the white cardboard.
To measure those forces, Coppersmith and her colleagues placed an open-ended cylinder filled with glass beads on a piece of carbon paper.
I can't believe that some of our college interns and new hires at Hewlett-Packard have never used carbon paper or dirtied their fingers changing a typewriter ribbon.