carbon disulfide


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car·bon di·sul·fide (CS2),

an extremely flammable (flashpoint -30°C), colorless, toxic liquid with a characteristic ethereal odor (fetid when impure); it is a parasiticide.
Synonym(s): carbon bisulfide

carbon disulfide

A highly flammable volatile liquid, absorbable through the skin, lungs and GI mucosa. It is a common building block in organic chemistry. It is used as a non-polar solvent to produce viscose rayon, cellophane, and carbon tetrachloride, as well as for fumigating grain, chemical analysis, degreasing, dry cleaning and oil extraction.
 
Toxicology
Neurotoxic, dermotoxic; it may retard growth and sensory development. It is teratogenic in rats; reproductive risk is uncertain, but likely.

carbon disulfide

(dī-sŭl′fīd)
A colorless liquid, CS2, that is toxic when it touches the skin or is inhaled or consumed. It may cause an alcohol-like intoxication, burns, stupor, coma, or death. It is used principally in the manufacture of products such as cellophane or rayon and sometimes causes occupational health-related illnesses in workers who produce these substances.

carbon disulfide

an inflammable, volatile liquid used for treatment of bot fly larvae in the stomach of horses. Administered by stomach tube. Mixed with air it is dangerously explosive. Excess doses cause excitement, weakness and collapse.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a further study on the extraction potential of various mixtures of chloroform and carbon disulfide, a series of experiments were carried out, including the effects of these blends at different compositions and solid-liquid mass ratio, on the oil yield.
The strength of this social learning on food choice is huge," says Galef, whose research has found that mixing carbon disulfide with rat poison draws four times as many rodents to the bait.
Samples were desorbed using carbon disulfide and analyzed using an HP 5890 gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector (Hewlett-Packard, Avondale, PA, USA) to measure the toluene levels in samples.
The two first of these reactions show how carbon disulfide may be converted into the carbon oxysulfide.
If more carbon than oxygen were dredged up, sulfur would combine with carbon to form carbon disulfide.
Toxicologists and industrial hygienists have identified four sulfur compound emissions in testing Chinese gypsum: carbon disulfide, carbonyl sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, and strontium sulfate (trace levels), at varying exposure levels, according to Manis.
Since less-skilled workers have taken our place there have been nine accidental releases into the air reported to federal agencies, including carbon disulfide and hydrogen sulfide, which are extremely toxic.
The solvents typically used to convert cellulose into a soluble compound--for example, to process wood pulp into rayon--include carbon disulfide and sodium hydroxide, both of which carry substantial health baggage.
The prevalent rayon production method used in producing tire yam - the viscose process - uses sodium hydroxide, carbon disulfide, hydrogen sulfide, sulfuric acid and zinc.
Miller's group began with small clusters, or "snowballs," of carbon disulfide.
Chinese-made drywall, Judge Fallon wrote in his decision, has significantly higher levels of hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide - all known irritants to humans - than "typical, benign drywall.
I was pleased to see the list of environmental exposures that affect human health--both those that are more common, such as lead, mercury, asbestos, organophosphate pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls, and others that are more unusual, such as manganese, bromine, and carbon disulfide (Hu 2003).