carbon dioxide content


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carbon dioxide

 
an odorless, colorless gas, CO2, resulting from oxidation of carbon, formed in the tissues and eliminated by the lungs; used in some pump oxygenators to maintain the carbon dioxide tension in the blood. It is also used in solid form; see carbon dioxide snow and carbon dioxide slush.
carbon dioxide combining power the ability of blood plasma to combine with carbon dioxide; indicative of the alkali reserve and a measure of the acid-base balance of the blood.
carbon dioxide content the amount of carbonic acid and bicarbonate in the blood; reported in millimoles per liter.
carbon dioxide–oxygen therapy administration of a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen (commonly 5 per cent CO2 and 95 per cent O2 or 10 per cent CO2 and 90 per cent O2); used for improvement of cerebral blood flow, stimulation of deep breathing, or treatment of singultation (hiccupping). Carbon dioxide acts by stimulating the respiratory center; it also increases heart rate and blood pressure. Therapy is given for 6 minutes or less with a 5 per cent mixture and 2 minutes or less with a 10 per cent mixture. Potential adverse effects include headache, dizziness, dyspnea, nausea, tachycardia and high blood pressure, blurred vision, mental depression, coma, and convulsions.
carbon dioxide slush solid carbon dioxide combined with a solvent such as acetone, and sometimes also alcohol; used as an escharotic to treat skin lesions such as warts and moles and as a peeling agent in chemabrasion.
carbon dioxide snow the solid formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide, giving a temperature of about −79°C (−110°F). It has been used in cryotherapy to freeze the skin, thus producing local anesthesia and arrest of blood flow. See also carbon dioxide slush.

car·bon di·ox·ide con·tent

the total carbon dioxide available from serum or plasma following addition of acid; measured routinely in hospital laboratories as a component of electrolyte profiles.

carbon dioxide content

CO2 content Arterial blood gases A measure of the relative blood concentration of CO2, measured using pH electrodes, by enzymes, or based on changes in pH Ref range < age 2–18-28 mmol/L; > 2 yrs–venous 22-26 mmol/L; > 2 yrs–arterial 22-32 mmol/L ↓ in Respiratory alkalosis–DKA, lactic acidosis, alcoholic ketoacidosis, hyperventilation, metabolic acidosis, kidney disease, renal failure, diarrhea, Addison's disease, ethylene glycol poisoning, methanol poisoning ↑ in Severe vomiting, gastric drainage, hypoventilation–eg, emphysema or pneumonia, hyperaldosteronism, Cushing syndrome. See Arterial blood gases.

carbon dioxide

an odorless, colorless gas, CO2, resulting from oxidation of carbons, formed in the tissues and eliminated by the lungs; used with oxygen to stimulate respiration and in solid form (carbon dioxide snow—see below) as an escharotic, as a gas to euthanize laboratory rabbits and rodents.

carbon dioxide anesthesia
exposure of pigs for 45 seconds in a mixture of 60 to 70% CO2 in air is an adequate pre-slaughter anesthetic for pigs.
carbon dioxide combining power
the ability of blood plasma to combine with carbon dioxide; indicative of the alkali reserve and a measure of the acid-base balance of the blood.
carbon dioxide content
the amount of carbonic acid and bicarbonate in the blood; reported in millimoles per liter.
carbon dioxide dissociation curve
a graph demonstrating the relationship between the blood content of CO2 and the Pco2.
carbon dioxide narcosis
respiratory acidosis.
carbon dioxide snow
solid carbon dioxide, formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide; it gives a temperature of about −110°F (−79°C), and is used as an escharotic in various skin diseases. Called also dry ice.
carbon dioxide tension
the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood; noted as Pco2 in blood gas analysis. See also respiration.
carbon dioxide transport
carbon dioxide passes from tissues to blood by diffusion, in the blood by solution and via reactions within plasma and erythrocytes, from blood to pulmonary alveoli by diffusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The growth rate of the air's carbon dioxide content, for example, has been constant since approximately 1975 and smaller than that assumed by the IPCC.
It measures the difference between the carbon dioxide content of the air at two different levels--one just above the plants and the other about three feet above the canopy [of rangeland plants]," explains ARS scientist Raymond Angell.
The government subsidizes corn-alcohol production, which slightly reduces the carbon dioxide content of engine gas discharge.
The well has also produced a carbon dioxide content that exceeds pipeline specifications.
When connected to a natural gas system, the company says the metering device can provide a fast, accurate, close to real time measurement of physical gas properties such as thermal conductivity, speed of sound and carbon dioxide content.
After connecting to a natural gas system, GasPT2 offers a fast, accurate, close to real-time measurement of physical gas properties including thermal conductivity, speed of sound and carbon dioxide content.
In a 1969 September memo, Moynihan wrote that there was a widespread agreement that carbon dioxide content would rise 25 percent by 2000.
All other influencing fermenting parameters, such as pitching rate, yeast generation, fermenting vessel geometry, the amount of assimilable nitrogen, yeast nutrients, oxygen and carbon dioxide content, and sugar content were the same for all trials regardless of the yeast used.
If we removed every last soul of the UK's 60 million people, and bulldozed the entire human edifice of industry, buildings and transport into the sea it would reduce global carbon dioxide emission by less than 2% and would not measurably alter atmospheric carbon dioxide content.
Sumaira Abdul Ali, an environmentalist and founder of Awaaz Foundation, said, "We need to increase Mumbai's tree cover urgently as that is the only way to reduce the carbon dioxide content in the air.
2] to monitor the oxygen and carbon dioxide content in food modified atmosphere packaging (MAP).
Geochemists can gauge the carbon dioxide content of the ancient atmosphere by studying fossilized soil, or paleosol, preserved in ancient rocks.

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