carbacephem


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carbacephem

 [kahr″bah-sef´em]
any of a class of antibiotics closely related to the cephalosporins in structure, antimicrobial activity, and use, but chemically more stable.

carbacephem

/car·ba·ceph·em/ (kahr″bah-sef´em) any of a class of antibiotics closely related to the cephalosporins in structure and use, but chemically more stable.

carbacephem

(kăr-bă-sĕph′ĕm)
A class of broad-spectrum antibiotic drugs, derived from cephalosporins, that resist degradation by bacterial beta-lactamases. One drug in this class is loracarbef.
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SRI International, an independent nonprofit research and development organization, and Blanca Pharmaceuticals, a company discovering and developing antibiotics for serious bacterial infections, today announced they will jointly develop and conduct final preclinical studies of Blanca's carbacephem antibiotic drug candidates, now in late-stage preclinical development.
Working with Blanca's seasoned management team and experts, we look forward to the successful development of their carbacephem antibiotic candidates, which have shown an excellent efficacy profile against major clinical targets.
Blanca is pleased to collaborate with SRI on the development of our carbacephem antibiotics.
Blanca Pharmaceuticals, LLC is a privately held California Limited Liability Company dedicated to discovering and developing parenteral and oral carbacephem antibiotics for the improved treatment of serious human bacterial infections, including those caused by resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.
The Company is focused exclusively on one development-stage parenteral carbacephem product, and one discovery-stage oral carbacephem program:
BP-102/Tazobactam, a parenteral, bactericidal fixed combination of a proprietary broad-spectrum carbacephem compound and a well-established b-lactamase inhibitor, now in late-stage preclinical development.
coli from the Factory Creek watershed were assayed for antibiotic resistance using the disc diffusion method with the following classes of antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, carbacephems, cephalosporins (1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation), macrolides, penicillins, polypeptides, quinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines.