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Related to capturers: outmaneuvered, roughed, finalised

capture

 [kap´choor]
1. the production of a ventricular complex from a supraventricular source following a period of atrioventricular dissociation.
2. in cardiac pacing terminology, the successful pacing of the heart by a pulse generator.

cap·ture

(kap'chūr),
Catching and holding a particle or an electrical impulse originating elsewhere.
[L. capio, pp. -tus, to take, seize]

capture

/cap·ture/ (kap´cher)
1. to seize or catch.
2. the coalescence of an atomic nucleus and a subatomic particle, usually resulting in an unstable mass.

atrial capture  depolarization of the atria in response to a stimulus either originating elsewhere in the heart or pacemaker-induced.
ventricular capture  depolarization of the ventricles in response to an impulse originating either in the supraventricular region or in an artificial pacemaker.

capture

[kap′chər]
1 the catching and holding of a nuclear particle, as an electron, or an electrical impulse originating elsewhere.
2 (in cardiology) the capture of control of the atria or ventricles after a period of independent beating caused by ectopic beats or an atrioventricular block.
3 (in cardiology) the ability of a pacemaker to electrically stimulate a cardiac chamber.

CAPTURE

c7E3 Fab Antiplatelet Therapy in Unstable Refractory angina. A trial assessing abciximab therapy + percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) on mortality and incidence of AMI and urgent intervention for recurrent ischaemia.
 
Primary endpoints
Composite of death, MI, or urgent intervention at 30 days of enrolment.
 
Conclusion
The primary endpoint occurred in 16% of abciximab patients and 11% of placebo patients, p = 0.012; patients with medical therapy-refractory unstable angina undergoing PTCA while receiving abciximab have decreased short-term thrombotic complications and MI compared to placebo.

capture

Cardiac pacing Depolarization of the atria and/or ventricles by an electrical stimulus delivered by an artificial pacemaker; one-to-one capture occurs when each electrical stimulus causes a corresponding depolarization. See Stimulation threshold.

cap·ture

(kap'shŭr)
Catching and holding a particle or an electrical impulse originating elsewhere.
[L. capio, pp. -tus, to take, seize]

capture

the snaring and restraint of an escaped domesticated animal or a feral animal. It requires safety for the captor and the subject. Includes physical means of trap cages, the thrown lariat, a handheld net for small companion animals. Thrownets for birds are still favored by lay persons. Veterinarians are more inclined to use immobilizing agents delivered by darts from bows and arrows or from dart guns. See also restraint.

capture-mark-release-recapture
technique for establishing the nature of animal movements and the size of populations.
capture shock syndrome
in recently captured animals with death 1-6 hours after capture. Signs include shallow, rapid respiration, tachycardia, physical collapse, hyperthermia, small pulse, elevated CPK levels, general vascular congestion at necropsy.
capture stress syndrome
stress syndrome in wild animals in captivity.
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landowners also had the right to exclude all potential capturers except
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His face haunted all of us from the small screen, as he clung on to life cocking a snook at his Iraqi capturers and showing the kind of resolve that earned the respect and applause of the nation, proving he really was made of "the right stuff".
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The Childhood Cancer Foundation of South Africa has covered the Registry's costs during the last 3 years, including salaries of 3 part-time data capturers and a data manager; R30 000 for a computer, printer and scanner; and the data capturers' training.
Information Management and Systems Support * Establishment of a National Health Information July 2011 Repository and Data Warehousing (NHIRD) * Provincial and District roll-out of the NHIRD November 2011 * Appointment of Information Officers and Data November 2011 Capturers 12.
Through the FPD, that'sit provided training on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections and TB to nurses throughout the district, and provided counsellors and data capturers at some clinics.
Routine clinical information on patients from clinician notes on standardised forms was entered into the FS electronic medical record (EMR) system by trained data capturers and downloaded and imported into a data warehouse weekly.