captioning

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captioning

noun A text display of spoken words presented on a television or movie screen which allows a deaf or hard-of-hearing viewer to follow the dialogue and the action of a program simultaneously.

verb To provide or create a text display of spoken worfs presented on a television or movie screen for the hard of hearing or deaf.

captioning

The display of spoken words as text on a television or a movie screen, to improve the comprehension of dialogue by hearing-impaired individuals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carter started Caption Reporters when awarded a three-year contract with WUSA Television station in 1993.
Users can translate these captions into multiple languages too when watching videos.
Thus the silent film era (1893-1929) represented one high point in the cultural history of the American deaf community, as well as a time of cultural equality with hearing people-a time when deaf people could go to the movie theatre and enjoy a film without interpreters, captions, decoders, or elaborate sound systems.
On October 9, 2010, President Obama signed the 21st Video Accessibility Act into law, requiring broadcasters to include closed captions with Web video content.
Captions Web Sites & Mobile Devices The captions can also be directed to a live web page which can be viewed on virtually all web browsers, including smart phones and tablets like the iPad[R] and iPod[R], with no special software or plug-ins needed.
Tape to Web: CPC software can convert broadcast closed captions on a video tape into any other captioning file for the web, including Flash, iTunes, QuickTime, YouTube, and Windows Media.
As the leading provider of captioning to the broadcast television industry, Caption Colorado was the obvious choice for WebEx," Praful Shah, vice president of Strategic Communications at WebEx.
com/e-captioning) which allows closed caption service companies to simply e-mail closed captioning files to Avid Media Composer users, without the need to physically mail master tapes back and forth, and without the generation loss that was typically incurred by older tape-based hardware encoding technology.
Today, utilizing e-Captioning, editors and post houses do not need to buy expensive closed caption hardware encoders.
3) no caption (book: ``The Miracle of Castel di Sangro'')
To support this new service, Blockbuster has purchased 2,500 TeleCaption VR-100 caption decoders -- the largest single purchase of caption decoders in captioning history.
Previously, closed caption data had to be translated into CEA-708 format from a SCC file which only contains NTSC CEA-608 data.