capsulorrhexis

cap·su·lor·rhex·is

(kap'sū-lō-reks'sis),
Technique used in cataract surgery by which a continuous circular tear is made in the anterior lens capsule.
[L. capsula, capsule, + G. rhēxis, rupture]

capsulorrhexis

/cap·su·lor·rhex·is/ (kap″su-lo-rek´sis) the making of a continuous circular tear in the anterior capsule during cataract surgery in order to allow expression or phacoemulsification of the nucleus of the lens.

capsulorrhexis

[kap′səlôrek′sis]
a surgical technique in which a continuous circular tear in the anterior capsule is made in the crystalline lens to allow phacoemulsification of the lens nucleus during cataract surgery.

cap·su·lor·rhex·is

(kap'sū-lō-reks'sis)
Technique used in cataract surgery by which a continuous circular tear is made in the anterior lens capsule.
[L. capsula, capsule, + G. rhēxis, rupture]

capsulorrhexis

removal of the lens capsule.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The system permits ophthalmology residents in training, or experienced surgeons who wish to refresh their skills, to experience the required decisions and tasks involved in performing cataract surgery in a virtual environment; beginning with a capsulorrhexis prior to phacoemulsification.
According to the Department of Ophthalmology at the Boston University School of Medicine, "The step of capsulorrhexis not infrequently inspires fear and trepidation in the beginning phacoemulsification surgeon.
However, new laser platforms have been developed which enable this femtosecond laser to operate in a similar fashion to perform lens fragmentation, anterior capsulorrhexis and corneal or limbal incisions at the time of cataract extraction.
The next step involves the creation of a continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis (CCC), which is a central opening created on the anterior capsule of the lens to enable the cataractous lens within to be removed.
0 mm clear corneal incision was made and a continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis was created, using trypan blue if necessary, following which hydrodissection was performed.
Either a continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis or an envelope capsulotomy was performed, with trypan blue if necessary.
They cover phaco surgery, microincisional cataract surgery, challenging cases, and complications, and include incision, capsulorrhexis, hydrodissection, nuclear dissection, horizontal and vertical chopping, phacoemulsification, biaxial microincisional surgery, posterior polar cataract, iris hooks in small pupil phaco, subluxated cataracts, torn rhexis, irrigation and aspiration, and intraocular lens insertion procedures.
Indeed, this is supported by clinical studies that reveal several critical aspects of cataract surgery are enhanced, including the ability to create the perfect capsulorrhexis, the formation of corneal and limbal relaxing incisions (of specific depth and diameter) and lens fragmentation (Table 6).
The capsulorrhexis is then created using forceps, which dig in and tear a round circle in the anterior lens capsule; this poses a risk for the capsulorrhexis to become torn.
The picture shows progression of the capsulorrhexis during phacoemulsification cataract surgery.
The aim of anterior capsulectomy or capsulorrhexis (rhexis) is to create a continuous central and curvilinear opening in the anterior lens capsule.
A-type' lens epithelial cells, which remain in the capsular bag and form a single cell layer around the capsulorrhexis