capping


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capping

 [kap´ing]
1. the provision of a protective or obstructive covering.
2. the movement of cell surface antigens into a small region (cap) on the cell surface owing to the cross-linking of antigens by specific antibody.
3. the covering of tooth cusps weakened by caries with a protective metal overlay.
4. colloquial term for replacement of the crown of a natural tooth with an artificial crown (cap).
pulp capping the covering of an exposed dental pulp with some material to provide protection against external influences and to encourage healing.

cap·ping

(kap'ing),
1. Covering.
2. The aggregation at one end of a cell of surface antigens that have been bound and cross linked by antibodies; this cap is then endocytosed by the cell.

capping

/cap·ping/ (kap´ing)
1. the provision of a protective or obstructive covering.
2. the formation of a polar cap on the surface of a cell concerned with immunologic responses, occurring as a result of movement of components on the cell surface into clusters or patches that coalesce to form the cap. The process is produced by reaction of antibody with the cell membrane and appears to involve cross-linking of antigenic determinants.

pulp capping  the covering of an exposed or nearly exposed dental pulp with some material to provide protection against external influences and to encourage healing.

capping

a process by which cell-surface molecules aggregate on a plasma membrane.

capping

Cell biology
(1) The movement of cross-linked cell surface proteins to the trailing edge of a moving cell or to the perinuclear region.
(2) Focal accumulation of intermediate filament protein in the pericentriolar region after microtubule disruption by colchicine.

Forensics
See Knee-capping.

Immunology
An energy-consuming contractile filament (actin and myosin)-mediated process seen on lymphocyte surfaces, which “strips” cells of their immunoglobulin (Ig receptors), providing the initial signal to activate lymphocytes; once antigens bind to surface Igs the complex coalesces, forming a “patch”, followed by migration of the cross-linked complexes towards one pole, forming a “cap”, which is internalised by B cells (an analogous phenomenon occurs in T cells and prolymphocytic leukemic cells). Cross-linking is the mitogenic signal that triggers cell differentiation.
 
Molecular biology
The process of adding a guanosine nucleotide to the 5’-end (start) of eukaryotic mRNA, then methylating the guanosine.

Physiology
The binding of protein (e.g., gelsolin) to the barbed end of F-actin in muscle to prevent further polymerisation.

capping

  1. the process in which eukaryotic mRNAs are modified (capped) at their 5' end. This involves addition of a GUANINE residue to the 5' end of newly formed mRNA molecules shortly after the start of TRANSCRIPTION. The guanine is then methylated (see METHYLATION). The 5' cap promotes TRANSLATION and is important in regulating GENE EXPRESSION.
  2. the formation of a cap in certain CELLS of EUKARYOTES, when membrane PROTEINS cluster together when treated with lectins or ANTIBODIES and subsequently collect at one end of the cell in an ENERGY-dependent process (capping).

cap·ping

(kap'ing)

capping

the provision of a protective or obstructive covering.

capping phenomenon
the movement of anitibody-induced clustering of plasma membrane molecules (patching) to a single pole of the cell.
pulp capping
the covering of an exposed dental pulp with some material to provide protection against external influences and to encourage healing.