capnometry

capnometry

 [kap-nom´ĕ-tre]
the determination of the end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide.

cap·nom·e·try

(kap-nom'ĕ-trē),
Measurement of CO2 in the proximal airway during inspiration and expiration. End tidal CO2 (or CO2 at the end of exspiration) is particularly useful clinically.

capnometry

/cap·nom·e·try/ (-tre) the determination of the end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide.

capnometry

[kapnom′ətrē]
the measurement of carbon dioxide in a volume of gas. The most common monitoring units are based on the selective absorption of infrared light by carbon dioxide and water vapor. Capnometry may also be performed by using mass spectrometry. See also end-tidal CO2.

capnometry

(1) Capnography, see there
(2) The science of measuring atmospheric concentrations of smoke—e.g., in smoke plumes or in flue gas.

cap·nom·e·try

(kap-nom'e-trē)
The process of measuring and recording the carbon dioxide concentration of exhaled air at the patient's airway using a capnometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, There should be the possibility of establishing volumetric capnometry.
Although there are some studies indicating that the auscultation, the following of pH, and colorimetric capnometry are successful techniques for detecting NET location, there are some restrictions (20-22).
The measurements were performed by using EMMA (Easy Note MB85) capnometry device on arrival and every 5 minutes thereafter until either the resuscitation was ceased or the patients had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).
The target firm develops and makes ultra-compact mainstream and sidestream capnography, multigas analysers, and handheld capnometry solutions.
Capnometry and air insufflation for assessing initial placement of gastric tubes.
Capnometry for continuous postoperative monitoring of nonintubated, spontaneously breathing patients.
By introducing safety standards such as pulse oximetry and capnometry, the rate was reduced to 0.
Capnometry can be considered to provide additional information regarding the early identification of hypoventilation, but is not an essential requirement of procedural sedation.
These include observing for cough and choking, auscultation of air insufflated through the tube, aspiration of fluid, visual inspection of the aspirates, testing of aspirates for pH or concentrations of bilirubin, pepsin or trypsin, observing for bubbling when the tip of the tube is held under water, testing the ability to speak, the use of magnetic detection, spring gauge pressure manometer, capnography, colorimetric capnometry or radiography.
Volume-based capnometry of the exhaled gas stream helps assess not only the CO2 production, but also the wasted fraction of ventilation (deadspace).
The dependent variables were the following: (1) successful management, as determined clinically by ease of use of the device, ability to accomplish additional tasks, ability to complete additional monitoring, ability to provide more thorough documentation, and overall assessment of the performance of the device as measured by a Likert scale completed by paramedics after transport; and (2) effectiveness of oxygenation and ventilation, as determined by pulse oximetry and capnometry.