capillary hemangioma


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Related to capillary hemangioma: Port wine stain, cavernous hemangioma

cap·il·lar·y he·man·gi·o·ma

an overgrowth of capillary blood vessels, seen most commonly in the skin, at or soon after birth, as a soft bright red to purple nodule or plaque that usually disappears by the fifth year. The most common type of hemangioma.

capillary hemangioma

a blood-filled birthmark or benign tumor consisting of closely packed small blood vessels. Commonly found during infancy, it first grows, then may spontaneously disappear in early childhood without treatment. Surgical removal is not usually attempted unless frequent trauma and bleeding are present. However, surgery may be performed later for cosmetic reasons. Also called hemangioma simplex, strawberry hemangioma, strawberry mark, nevus vascularis. Compare cavernous hemangioma, nevus flammeus.
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Capillary hemangioma

capillary hemangioma

A painless benign vascularised skin lesion which develops shortly after birth.
 
Prognosis
Many disappear in early childhood.
 
Management
Local steroid injections often reduce the lesion’s size.

capillary hemangioma

Dermatology A painless benign vascularized red–purple skin lesion that develops shortly after birth Prognosis Many CHs disappear in early childhood Management Local steroid injections may ↓ the CH's size

cap·il·lar·y he·man·gi·o·ma

(kap'i-lār-ē hē-man'jē-ō'mă)
An overgrowth of capillary blood vessels, seen most commonly in the skin, at or soon after birth, as a soft bright red to purple nodule or plaque that usually disappears by the fifth year. The most common type of hemangioma.
Synonym(s): nevus vascularis, nevus vasculosus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tumour markers, including endothelial (CD31, CD34, factor VIII-related antigen, vascular endothelial growth factor) or mesenchymal (vimentin) markers, have previously been reported as positive in capillary hemangioma of the testis.
The hemangioendothelioma may have areas resembling the juvenile form of capillary hemangioma.
The difficulty tends to lie not in distinguishing glomangiopericytoma from sarcomas, as the latter are usually clearly malignant, but rather in differentiating them from other benign/borderline vascular-rich spindle cell lesions, most commonly, lobular capillary hemangioma (pyogenic granuloma), SFT, leiomyoma, and angiofibroma.
However, unlike the histology seen in these 3 cases, most of the hemangiomas that have been reported in the sinonasal region were either classic capillary hemangiomas, (15) cavernous hemangiomas, (16) or ossifying angiomas.
Because of its histologic similarity to other vascular lesions, the differential diagnosis may include cavernous and capillary hemangioma, (8) bacillary angiomatosis, (9) and other rare vascular lesions.
Juvenile hemangioma" is well recognized as only a clinical term, since a capillary hemangioma can occur in a juvenile setting, as can a cavernous hemangioma.
6) In children, the most common manifestation is capillary hemangioma, whereas in adults the cavernous variation is more frequent.
Other lesions that should be considered in the differential diagnosis include a cavernous hemangioma, a papillary endothelial hyperplasia, a disseminated lobular capillary hemangioma, and epithelioid anglomatosis.
Capillary hemangiomas are more common in infants, while cavernous lesions are more common in adults.
5) Most of these tumors are capillary hemangiomas of osteogenic origin.