capillariasis

capillariasis

 [kap″ĭ-lah-ri´ah-sis]
infection with nematodes of the genus Capillaria, especially C. philippinensis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea and malabsorption that can be fatal.

ca·pil·la·ri·a·sis

(kap'i-lār-ī'ă-sis),
A disease caused by infection with nematodes of the genus Capillaria.

capillariasis

/cap·il·la·ri·a·sis/ (kap″ĭ-lah-ri´ah-sis) infection with nematodes of the genus Capillaria, especially C. philippinensis.

capillariasis

[kap′ilərī′əsis]
infection with nematodes of the genus Capillaria, species of which attack various different animals. Human infection is usually by C. philippinensis, which infests the intestines and causes severe diarrhea, malabsorption, and often death. More rarely, infection with C. hepatica can cause human hepatic capillariasis, and C. aerophila can cause human pulmonary capillariasis.

capillariasis

An infection with the parasitic worm Capillaria phillipinensis which invades the lining of the small intestine causing pain and severe diarrhoea and interfering with the absorption of food.

capillariasis

infection with nematodes of the genus Capillaria. In birds the disease is manifested by chronic gastroenteritis and the affected birds are emaciated. The disease in mammals may be enteritis with diarrhea (C. bovis, C. entomelas), cystitis (C. felis cati, C. plica), hepatitis (C. hepatica) or bronchopneumonia (C. aerophila, C. didelphis).
References in periodicals archive ?
To eliminate the so-called neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in Zamboanga Peninsula, a team from the Department of Health (DOH)-9 has conducted a media forum on filariasis, schistosomiasis, capillariasis including intestinal worms at the Guillermo Hotel here recently.
Capillaria philippinensis causes human intestinal capillariasis [1].
These conspicuous mouth markings should not be mistaken for lesions, such as those seen with oral trichomoniasis, candidiasis, bacterial stomatitis, viral infection (poxvirus, herpesvirus), oral capillariasis or other nematodes, or squamous metaplasia caused by vitamin A deficiency.
To the Editor: Capillariasis is caused by the foodborne nematode Capillaria philippinensis.
These deaths were attributed to capillariasis, but their cause was never confirmed (5).
Among the 10 persons who had capillariasis, 8 were from Barangay (smallest adminstrative region) Matam, 1 from Barangay Dabiak, and 1 from Barangay Carupay, a nearby barangay.
A total of 24 persons in Katipunan were interviewed regarding history of capillariasis and their eating habits.
The drug of choice for treating patients with capillariasis is mebendazole, 200 mg 2x/day for 20-30 days.
For example, the Department of Education in the Philippines may become involved in dissemination of information on capillariasis to students and in early detection and treatment of infected school children.
The chapter on intestinal capillariasis by Cross and Belizario is particularly noteworthy.