canthaxanthin


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canthaxanthin

(kăn′thə-zăn′thĭn)
n.
A red carotenoid pigment, C40H52O2, produced by certain microorganisms and found in some mushrooms, crustaceans, and fish. It is used in animal feed to impart color and as a dietary supplement for its antioxidant properties.

canthaxanthin

Dermatology
A lipid-soluble synthetic red-orange carotenoid which humans cannot convert to vitamin. It deposits in the skin, imparting a pink-orange hue, and has been marketed as a tanning agent under various names— without FDA approval—often in combination with beta-carotene.

Food industry
Canthaxanthin is produced naturally by some plants and marine animals; it is approved by the FDA as a dye for soups, fruit drinks, catsup, salad dressings, tomato juice, and others, and may be added to animal feed to “enhance” the colours of chicken skin, egg yolks, rainbow trout flesh and other foods.

Fringe oncology
Canthaxanthin stimulates the immune system and enhance vitamin E’s antioxidant activity; it may reduce the incidence of spontaneous cancer in experimental animals.
 
Toxicity
Allergic reactions, canthaxanthin retinopathy (deposits in the macula), hives, itching, hepatitis and aplastic anaemia.

canthaxanthin

Food industry A synthetic carotenoid which in humans cannot be converted to vitamin A, which has been marketed as a tanning agent under various names; it has been implicated in aplastic anemia. See Artificial dye, Carotenoid, Tanning, Unproven methods for cancer management.

canthaxanthin (kanˈ·thak·sanˑ·thin),

n an herbal preparation promoted as a tanning agent for the skin. An orange carotenoid approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only as a color additive for food products. When ingested in excessive doses, it has been shown to produce symptoms of retinopathy and accumulation of yellowish gold–colored deposits around the macula.

canthaxanthin

a carotenoid used as a coloring agent; also administered orally in humans to produce artificial suntan, and to canaries carrying the red factor to produce a stronger red color.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dose response to astaxanthin and canthaxanthin pigmentation of rainbow trout fed various dietary carotenoids concentrations.
On the basis of type, carotenoids are segmented into astaxanthin, beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, canthaxanthin, and zeaxanthin.
Even today, carotenoid is only known as a natural color agent in many countries despite the discovery of its various product types like astaxanthin, canthaxanthin, and lycopene among many others.
Astaxanthin, canthaxanthin and beta-carotene differently affect UVA-induced oxidative damage and expression of oxidative stress-responsive enzymes.
The experiments had following treatments: (a) negative control (basal diet having no pigments); (b) positive control (layer diet corn-soya based and having commercial pigments; Canthaxanthin 1500 mg/kg and ACAEE 500 mg/kg); (c) tree sweet potato cultivars ['Beauregard' (B), Hatay Beyazi' (HB) and 'Hatay Kirmizi' (HK)] with three supplemental doses (15, 20 and 25 mg/kg total xanthophyll).
2004), fucoxanthin (Fuco), diadinoxanthin (Diadino) and diatoxanthin (Diato) were analysed as marker pigments for diatoms (Leavitt & Hodgson 2001; Buchaca & Catalan 2007a, 2007b), zeaxanthin (Zea) as a marker pigment for total CY and canthaxanthin (Cantha) as a marker pigment for colonial CY (Leavitt & Hodgson 2001; McGowan et al.
Besides the registration work undertaken in some markets, in November 2009, the company filed for a patent with the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), entitled: "Use of canthaxanthin and/or at least one vitamin D metabolite, preferably 25-OH D3 for improved hatchability in poultry".
Nutritional status influences cancer risk: there is higher risk for those deficient in beta-carotene, lycopene, canthaxanthin, alphatocopherol, folic acid, and vitamin D3.
An accumulation of dietary AX in the integument (carapace and epidermis) and hepatopancreas of Marsupenaeus japonicus by supplementing synthetic AX and canthaxanthin has also been observed (Negre-Sadargues et al.
These exceptions include lutein, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin.