canon law

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canon law

A body of law and edicts that arise from and are adopted by an ecclesiastic authority, which guides how Christian organisations are governed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since even the canonists recognized the emperor as "lord of the world," (38) he proclaimed the Ghibelline views of the emperor's superiority to the pope and relegated the papacy only to things spiritual: "Among those living in this world and all that belongs to mutable and human things and temporal power, nothing is greater than the Empire": "Unctio enim non facit maiorem eum qui ungit eo qui ungitur" ("Unction does not make him who anoints greater than him who is anointed").
The image of Anselm the canonist is developed in the next chapter as well as in the appendices and tables.
insists--despite the fact that a majority of American canonists said publically that it was too cumbersome and they were too inexperienced with the penal process.
The Salamanca canonist Juan Alfonso de Benavente's De scientiarum laudibus, to judge from its title, may have been one example from the later fifteenth century, but it is lost.
It is of note that the great decretalist Hostiensis specifically rejected Innocent's argument and revived the theory of the early 13th-century canonist Alanus Anglicus that infidels had no right to dominion and property, inasmuch as dominion pertained only to those who live by the grace of Christ.
An examination of her writings by a dogmatist, a moral theologian and a canonist has concluded that the writings are "in complete fidelity to the Church".
Each canonist said that in his years of experience, he had heard of only one accusation of violating the seal and neither was sustained.
An even more extreme hypothetical case is the famous one proposed by the Italian canonist Jemolo where a man marries a woman for the purpose of carrying out a vendetta against the wife's family.
He describes Joachim's Liber figurarum as "a heretical text" (16); he seems to assume that Ockham invented the ecclesiological and canonist chestnut that a two-headed church "body" is a monster (69); he says that Wyclif received the living of Lutterworth in 1381 at the instance of Gaunt and the queen mother (106; he had received it from Edward III in 1374); he speaks of a "Yorkist interest" in the politics of the 1390s (132), almost fifty years before the phrase can be used meaningfully.
Poliakov calls attention to the Consilia against Indaeos foenerantes drawn up by the canonist lawyer Alexander de Nevo in Padua between 1440 and 1455.
Orsy, a leading canonist well-known for his theological expertise, acknowledged, however, that the question of which church doctrines are taught infallibly is "extremely complex.