cannula

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cannula

 [kan´u-lah]
a tube for insertion into a vessel, duct, or cavity. During insertion its lumen is usually occupied by a trocar; following placement, the trocar is removed and the cannula remains patent as a channel for the flow of fluids.
nasal cannula one that fits into the nostrils for delivery of oxygen therapy. Called also nasal prongs.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă),
A tube that can be inserted into a cavity, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen; after insertion of the cannula, the trocar is withdrawn and the cannula remains as a channel for the transport of fluid or passage of instruments.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]

cannula

/can·nu·la/ (kan´u-lah) a tube for insertion into a vessel, duct, or cavity; during insertion its lumen is usually occupied by a trocar.

cannula

also

canula

(kăn′yə-lə)
n. pl. cannu·las or cannu·lae (-lē′)
A flexible tube, usually containing a trocar at one end, that is inserted into a bodily cavity, duct, or vessel to drain fluid or administer a substance such as a medication.

cannula

[kan′yələ] pl. cannulas, cannulae
Etymology: L, small tube
a flexible tube that may be inserted into a duct or cavity to deliver medication or drain fluid. It may be guided by a sharp, pointed instrument (trocar). A body fluid may be passed through the cannula to the outside. See also nasal cannula. cannular, cannulate, adj.

cannula

A tube inserted into a duct, cavity or other space; its lumen is maintained closed by a trocar during insertion.

cannula

Surgery A tube inserted into a duct, cavity or other space; during insertion, its lumen is occluded by a trocar. See Endoscopy, Nasal cannula, QuickDrawvenous cannula, Trocar.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă)
A tube that can be inserted into a cavity or vein, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen; after insertion of the cannula, the trocar is withdrawn and the cannula remains as a channel for the transport of fluid. Intravenous cannulas should be changed regularly to prevent thrombophlebitis.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]

cannula

(kan'u-la) [L., a small reed]
Enlarge picture
NEEDLELESS CANNULAE USED TO CONNECT AN ADDITIVE TO PRIMARY INTRAVENOUS INFUSIONS
A tube or sheath that encloses a trocar. After the device is inserted into a blood vessel, body cavity, duct, or hollow organ, withdrawal of the trocar lets fluid drain (so that it can be collected or sampled) or escape. See: illustration

Bellocq's cannula

See: Bellocq's cannula
Enlarge picture
NASAL CANNULA FOR OXYGEN DELIVERY.

nasal cannula

Tubing used to deliver oxygen at levels from 1 to 6 L/min. The nasal prongs of the cannula extend approx. 1 cm into each naris and are connected to a common tube, which is then connected to the oxygen source. It is used to treat conditions in which a slightly enriched oxygen content is needed, such as emphysema. The exact percentage of oxygen delivered to the patient varies with respiratory rate and other factors.
illustrationillustration

cannula

A hollow surgical tube, into which is inserted a close fitting, sharp-pointed inner stiffener called a trocar. The combination can easily be pushed through the skin or the lining of a blood vessel or other tissue. When in position, the trocar is pulled backwards out of the cannula, leaving the latter in place. Fluids or other materials may then be passed.

Cannula

A tube inserted into a cavity to serve as a channel for the transport of fluid.

can·nu·la

(kan'yū-lă)
Tube that can be inserted into a cavity, usually by means of a trocar filling its lumen.
[L. dim. of canna, reed]

cannula (kan´yələ),

n a tube for insertion into the body; its caliber is usually occupied by a trocar during the act of insertion.
cannula, nasal,
n a small, half-moon shaped plastic tube, the ends of which fit into the nostrils of an individual.

cannula

a tube for insertion into a duct or cavity; during insertion its lumen may be occupied by a trocar.

nasal cannula
a means of delivering oxygen to dogs or cats over a long period.
References in periodicals archive ?
8220;The EntreVu EX cannula formed with Makrolon polycarbonate offers medical professionals a new technology for patient care during surgery.
Cannulas can allow bacteria directly into the bloodstream although the incidence of infections is low.
5, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after inclusion: ease of cannulation, incidence of bad sticks, pain, compression time after cannula removed, oozing of blood alongside the cannula, re-bleeding of puncture site after compression, signs of infection, aneurysm formation and thrombosis.
On the basis of products, the market is divided into cardiac cannulas, vascular cannulas, nasal cannulas, arthroscopy cannulas, dermatology cannulas and others (floating spinal cannulas, vitreoretinal cannulas, hysterosalpingography cannulas).
The new medical device provides a cost-effective alternative to re-usable cannulas used for liposuction and have been clinically evaluated with positive feedback and results
The Jetco Spray Cannulas are now packed in a convenient 10-pack.
Passage of AB2841 into law would require written disclosure to patients that a reusable cannula has been used on other patients to perform a liposuction or fat transfer procedure, and that alternatives in the form of disposable cannulas may be available for the procedure.
1) cannulas or medical suction tubes or accessories (200 Unit)
In vertebral augmentation procedures, physicians must skillfully navigate their access cannulas through a small bridge of bone known as the pedicle, the anatomical formation that grants access to the vertebral body.