cannon


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Can·non

(kan'ŏn),
Walter B., U.S. physiologist, 1871-1945. See: Cannon ring, Cannon theory, Cannon-Bard theory, Bernard-Cannon homeostasis.

cannon

(kăn′ən)
n. pl. cannon or can·nons
1. A round bit for a horse.
2. Zoology The section of the lower leg in some hoofed mammals between the hock or knee and the fetlock, containing the cannon bone.
v. can·noned, can·noning, can·nons
References in classic literature ?
At length they heard the cannon so near that it was evident they were within a league of the field of battle, and at a turn of the road they perceived the little village of Aunay.
Just then there was a whistle in the air; nearer and nearer, faster and louder, louder and faster, a cannon ball, as if it had not finished saying what was necessary, thudded into the ground near the shed with super human force, throwing up a mass of earth.
A happy thought occurred to me as I stood upon the little deck of the Amoz with the first of Perry's primi-tive cannon behind me.
Another thing that surprised me was the fact that so much had been accomplished in so short a time, for I could not believe that I had been gone from Anoroc for a sufficient period to permit of building a fleet of fifty feluccas and mining iron ore for the cannon and balls, to say nothing of manufacturing these guns and the crude muzzle-loading rifles with which every Mezop was armed, as well as the gunpowder and ammunition they had in such ample quantities.
The roar of the cannon shook the cottage for the second time.
She had just laid her hand on the lock when the third report of cannon burst over the place.
In point of grazing, plunging, oblique, or enfilading, or point-blank firing, the English, French, and Prussians have nothing to learn; but their cannon, howitzers, and mortars are mere pocket-pistols compared with the formidable engines of the American artillery.
The inventor of a new cannon associated himself with the caster and the borer.
The history of its victory over earlier criticism, and its difficulties with the modern experimental work of Sherrington and Cannon, is well told by James R.
Rage and fear have been especially studied by Cannon, whose work is of the greatest importance.
As long as it went through more frequented waters, we often saw the hulls of shipwrecked vessels that were rotting in the depths, and deeper down cannons, bullets, anchors, chains, and a thousand other iron materials eaten up by rust.
There, in three or four fathoms of water, between the reefs of Pacou and Vanou, lay anchors, cannons, pigs of lead and iron, embedded in the limy concretions.