cannabis intoxication


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intoxication

 [in-tok″sĭ-ka´shun]
1. stimulation, excitement, or impaired judgment caused by a chemical substance, or as if by one.
2. substance intoxication, especially that due to ingestion of alcohol (see discussion at alcoholism). Alcohol intoxication is defined legally according to a person's blood alcohol level; the definition is 0.10 per cent or more in most states in the U.S. and 0.8 per cent or more in Canada.
alcohol idiosyncratic intoxication a term previously used for marked behavioral change, usually belligerence, produced by ingestion of small amounts of alcohol that would not cause intoxication in most persons. It is now felt that there is no evidence for a distinction between this condition and any other form of alcohol intoxication.
caffeine intoxication caffeinism (def. 2).
cannabis intoxication physiological and psychological symptoms following the smoking of marijuana or hashish, including euphoria, preoccupation with auditory and visual stimuli, and apathy. Intoxication occurs almost immediately after smoking and peaks within 30 minutes.
pathological intoxication alcohol idiosyncratic i.
substance intoxication a type of substance-induced disorder, consisting of reversible, substance-specific, maladaptive behavioral or psychological changes directly resulting from the physiologic effects on the central nervous system of recent ingestion of or exposure to a drug of abuse, medication, or toxin. Specific cases are named on the basis of etiology, e.g., alcohol intoxication.
water intoxication a condition resulting from undue retention of water with decrease in sodium concentration, marked by lethargy, nausea, vomiting, and mild mental aberrations; in severe cases there may be convulsions and coma.

cannabis intoxication

See Amotivational syndrome, Marijuana.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to a 2011 paper by the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, acute cannabis intoxication after inhalation has been shown to mildly impair psychomotor skills, but the impairment is seldom severe or long-lasting.
Between 2009 and 2011, as use rates went up, the rate of emergency room visits for cannabis intoxication rose by 19 percent, according to the Drug Abuse Warning Network.
He said: "Cannabis has an effect on people, there is no safe level of cannabis intoxication.