cane

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cane

 [kān]
an assistive device that provides partial support and balance for ambulation and standing.
 Cane. A and B, adjustable canes. C, quadripod (quad) cane.
adjustable cane a cane whose length can be easily altered.
quadripod cane a cane adapted for increased stability by providing a four-legged rectangular base of support.
tripod cane one similar to a quadripod cane except that its base is triangular with three legs.
white cane a cane used by the visually handicapped to increase awareness of the immediate environment; the white color is a sign to others that the user is blind.

cane

(kān)
n.
A stick used as an aid in walking or carried as an accessory.

can′er n.

cane

Etymology: Ar, qanah, reed
a sturdy wooden or metal shaft or walking stick used to give support and mobility during walking to a person with impaired mobility. A cane should be of an appropriate length to allow a person with an injured leg to walk with it held on the side of the noninjured leg. In walking, the person may rest his or her weight on the cane and the injured leg while moving the unaffected leg forward. To take the next step, the weight is placed on the sound leg while the injured leg and cane are moved forward. The cane should allow 25 degrees of elbow flexion.
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Single and quad-foot canes

cane

(kān)
An assistive device prescribed to provide support during ambulation and transfers for individuals with weakness, instability, pain, or balance loss. It also may be used to unload a lower extremity joint or to partially eliminate weight-bearing. Standard (conventional) canes are made from wood or aluminum and have a variety of hand grip styles. Other styles include tripod canes, quadruped (quad) canes, and walk (“hemi”) canes. Canes should be used on the unaffected (stronger) side of the body.
References in classic literature ?
I began to think we were fairly snared, and had almost made up my mind that without a pair of wings we should never be able to escape from the toils; when all at once I discerned a peep of daylight through the canes on my right, and, communicating the joyful tidings to Toby, we both fell to with fresh spirit, and speedily opening the passage towards it we found ourselves clear of perplexities, and in the near vicinity of the ridge.
demanded the schoolmaster, administering a cut with the cane to expedite the reply.
Yes," said the governor, "or if not I am the greatest dolt in the world; now you will see whether I have got the headpiece to govern a whole kingdom;" and he ordered the cane to be broken in two, there, in the presence of all.
His whiskers cut off, Noirtier gave another turn to his hair; took, instead of his black cravat, a colored neckerchief which lay at the top of an open portmanteau; put on, in lieu of his blue and high-buttoned frock-coat, a coat of Villefort's of dark brown, and cut away in front; tried on before the glass a narrow-brimmed hat of his son's, which appeared to fit him perfectly, and, leaving his cane in the corner where he had deposited it, he took up a small bamboo switch, cut the air with it once or twice, and walked about with that easy swagger which was one of his principal characteristics.
Monsieur de Chavigny handed his cane to Monsieur de Beaufort.
Denham merely smiled, and replacing the malacca cane on the rack, he drew a sword from its ornamental sheath.
The gold-headed cane is farcical considered as an acknowledgment to me; but happily I am above mercenary considerations.
That casting from his path a weeping mother, the goaded father at last dashed from the house yelling that he was away to buy a cane.
He walked with a springier step, he carried a little cane and he was whistling softly to himself.
Holding a cane in her hand, she stood self-proclaimed as my small friend's mother.
My cane may be useful upstairs," retorted Benjamin, gruffly.
She appealed to Sir Patrick, poised easily on his ivory cane, and looking out at the lawn-party, the picture of venerable innocence.