cane toad


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cane toad

see bufo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the potential range of the cane toad in southern Australia is separated from the toad's tropical range by large expanses of desert, too dry for a toad to cross.
While it is expected that these studies will provide a much better picture of the impact of cane toads on native species in the short term, there are only limited options currently available for sustained cane toad control.
If all goes well during the next two years, the scientists will be able to determine the feasibility of this approach for cane toad control.
Despite attempts to destroy them, there are an estimated 200million cane toads in Australia.
They are prolific breeders - with females laying about 40,000 eggs at a time - and could end up being more damaging than the cane toad.
Myxosporea) causing disease in Australian endemic frogs found in the invasive Cane Toad.
People saw these ugly creatures moving across tropical Australia and common sense said there was going to be a huge disaster," says Richard Shine, an invasive species researcher at the University of Sydney, who has reviewed various studies on the impact of cane toads.
Then, the scientific explanations of 18 seemingly docile animals' defense mechanisms leave the reader wanting to know more about these unique creatures, such as the cassowary, electric caterpillar, cane toad, and puffer fish.
The do-gooders need to see the painful death our native animals go through after coming in contact with a cane toad.
THE cane toad was introduced to Australia to control beetle pests in sugar cane.
The list of alien parasite experiments which went wrong include: Killer snails (Euglandina rosea) were introduced to Hawaii to control the giant African land snail but they started attacking native snails too the cane toad, brought in by Australian farmers to control the cane beetle, spread rapidly, killing animals who tried to attack them the mongoose, introduced to Hawaii to keep down rat numbers, soon found it much easier to dine on birds' eggs instead.
Hundreds of people turned out for an inaugural cane toad hunt in northern Australia over the weekend, hoping to curb the impact of the toxic amphibians that have left a path of destruction since arriving here more than 70 years ago, local media reported Sunday.