candidosis


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Related to candidosis: candida, candidiasis, aspergillosis

candidiasis

 [kan″dĭ-di´ah-sis]
infection by fungi of the genus Candida, generally C. albicans, most commonly involving the skin, oral mucosa (thrush), respiratory tract, or vagina; occasionally there is a systemic infection or endocarditis. It is most often associated with pregnancy, glycosuria, diabetes mellitus, or use of antibiotics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that in the United States this condition is the fourth most common cause of nosocomial infections of the blood stream. Called also candidosis and moniliasis.

The most prominent symptom of vaginitis due to Candida infection is severe itching. Sexual transmission is unlikely. Intravaginal cream containing miconazole or clotrimazole, applied each night for one week, usually clears up the infection. Difficulty or pain with swallowing, or retrosternal pain, may indicate candidiasis of the esophagus. Systemic antifungal therapy is indicated for esophagitis and other more severe forms of the disease. Therapeutic options include ketoconazole, fluconazole, and amphotericin b. Chronic suppressive therapy is sometimes required for severely immunocompromised patients. The Infectious Disease Society of America has published “Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Candidiasis” on their web site, http://www.idsociety.org.
atrophic candidiasis oral candidiasis marked by erythematous, pebbled patches on the hard or soft palate, buccal mucosa, and dorsal surface of the tongue, a complication of numerous different conditions such as vitamin deficiency, diabetes mellitus, or poorly fitting dentures. There are acute forms and a chronic form called denture stomatitis.
bronchopulmonary candidiasis candidiasis of the respiratory tree, occurring in a mild afebrile form manifested as chronic bronchitis, and in a usually fatal form resembling tuberculosis. Called also bronchocandidiasis.
chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis a group comprising a number of varying forms of Candida infection, marked by chronic candidiasis of the skin and nails and the mucous membranes of the mouth and vagina that is resistant to treatment; it may be localized or diffuse, is sometimes familial, and may be associated with disorders of the immune and endocrine systems.
endocardial candidiasis Candida endocarditis.
oral candidiasis thrush.
pulmonary candidiasis a type of fungal pneumonia caused by infection with Candida species, seen especially in immunocompromised patients or those with malignancies. Called also Candida pneumonia.
vaginal candidiasis (vulvovaginal candidiasis) candidal infection of the vagina, and usually also the vulva, commonly characterized by itching, creamy white discharge, vulvar redness and swelling, and dyspareunia. Called also Candida or candidal vaginitis and Candida or candidal vulvovaginitis.

can·di·di·a·sis

(kan'di-dī'ă-sis),
Infection with, or disease caused by, Candida, especially C. albicans. This disease usually results from debilitation (as in immunosuppression and especially AIDS), physiologic change, prolonged administration of antibiotics, and iatrogenic and barrier breakage.
Synonym(s): candidosis, moniliasis

candidosis

(kăn′dĭ-dō′sĭs)

candidiasis

Infection with Candida species, especially of mucocutaneous surfaces, which is usually caused by C albicans.
 
Clinical
 Dysphagia, oral lesions.
 
Diagnosis
Endoscopy, cytology, cultures.
 
Management
Ketoconazole, fluconazole.

can·di·di·a·sis

(kandi-dīă-sis)
Infection with, or disease caused by, Candida, especially C. albicans. This disease usually results from debilitation (as in immunosuppression and especially AIDS), physiologic change, prolonged administration of antibiotics, and barrier breakage. Commonly affected areas include the skin, oral mucous membranes, respiratory tract, and vagina.
Synonym(s): candidosis, moniliasis.

candidiasis

; candidosis infection with, or disease state caused by, Candida spp.

candidosis

see candidiasis.

candidiasis, candidosis

infection by fungi of the genus Candida, generally C. albicans. Three specific syndromes are recorded as being caused by C. albicans: (1) mycotic stomatitis of baby pigs which can spread to the lower alimentary tract and cause fatal enteritis; (2) chronic pneumonia in cattle in feedlots; (3) thrush-like lesions in the mouth of many species and esophagus, crop, proventriculus and gizzard of birds. Many other secondary infections occur, e.g. keratoconjunctivitis, stomatitis, bovine mastitis, esophagitis and ulcerative dermatitis in dogs. Candida is a common pathogen in immunosuppressed dogs or cats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hube, "Secreted aspartic proteinase (Sap) activity contributes to tissue damage in a model of human oral candidosis," Molecular Microbiology, vol.
En primer lugar, se encuentra la candidosis oral, en casos extremos como el de Nigeria, en el 2006, con una prevalencia del 78% en poblaciones que no reciben ARV; en contraste con el 19% de Tanzania o el 1% de Malawi.
Even though the colonization by Candida may be asymptomatic, heavy growth usually leads to local candidosis, with various types of mucosal lesions and symptoms (Shay et al.
1) Denture associated stomatitis is one of the most common clinical presentations of oral candidosis, affecting 24-60% of otherwise well denture wearers.
PGA I has been described under other names, such as Whitaker's syndrome, polyglandular autoimmune disease type 1, or autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidosis, ectodermal dystrophy.
Candida species coexist with most healthy individuals without causing problems but may cause mucocutaneous candidosis - or thrush - in some people.
Emergence of fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida albicans in patients with recurrent oropharyngeal candidosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection.
Use of Punica granatum as an antifungal agent against candidosis associated with denture stomatitis.
Molecular and phenotypic analysis of Candida dubliniensis: a recently identified species linked with oral candidosis in HIV-infected and AIDS patients.
On examination he was cachexic and had oral candidosis and penile ulcers typical of genital herpes (subsequently confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction test).