campylobacter enteritis


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Campylobacter enteritis

intestinal infection of humans or other mammals by a species of Campylobacter, characterized by diarrhea that may be bloody, abdominal pain with cramps and fever. The cause is usually ingestion of contaminated food or water. Also called enteric campylobacteriosis.

campylobacter enteritis

Infectious disease A water-borne gastroenteritis caused by C jejuni, a cause of travelers' diarrhea Epidemiology Linked to ingestion of contaminated eggs, poultry, water; 2-4 day incubation period Clinical Abdominal pain, ± bloody, watery diarrhea, fever. See Campylobacter jejuni.

campylobacter enteritis

A common type of food poisoning, caused by the organism Campylobacter jejuni . Sources of infection include water, raw milk, poultry and dogs.
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Campylobacter enteritis cases are usually self-limiting, but treatment with antibiotics may be required e.
Campylobacter enteritis outbreaks associated with drinking raw milk during youth activities.
7% of all (includes Campylobacter enteritis, amebiasis, giardiasis, yersiniosis) LRE cases reported working in sensitive occupations (i.
An increase in the prevalence of pneumonia and Campylobacter enteritis (a bacterial infection) is reported, as well as a doubling of the risk of infection with Clostridium difficile.
Bacterial food-borne diseases shared by man and animals include Campylobacter enteritis, E.
143 2 AIDS/HIV 9 9 9 3 Amebic Dysentery 9 3 3 4 Anthrax, cutaneous 9 3 3 5 Ascariasis 1 1 1 6 Brucellosis 9 3 1 7 Campylobacter Enteritis 9 1 1 Human Cost Geography Frequency Weight Must Total To One = 0.
Epidemiologic and laboratory investigation of an outbreak of Campylobacter enteritis associated with raw milk.
Navy) to develop a diagnostic test for the detection of Campylobacter enteritis and Shigella dysentery.
The dioxin crisis as experiment to determine poultry-related campylobacter enteritis.
Macrolides and fluoroquinolones generally are the first- and second-line choices, respectively, of antimicrobial drugs for treating Campylobacter enteritis.
Analysis of hospitalized cases was based on patients with a principal diagnosis code for Campylobacter enteritis (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification, code 008.