cambium layer

cam·bi·um lay·er

1. the inner osteogenic layer of the periosteum;
2. a highly cellular zone immediately beneath the epithelium covering a botryoid sarcoma.

cambium layer

Etymology: L, cambire, to exchange
1 the loose inner cellular layer of the periosteum that develops during ossification.
2 a cellular layer of formative tissue that lies between the wood and the bark in plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
In trees such as maples and oaks, cells grow and multiply in the cambium layer, just below the bark, increasing the diameter of the tree.
Immediately beneath the outer skin or bark of every plant there is a layer of cells called the cambium layer.
Make an angled cut to expose the cambium layer just beneath the bark.
One answer is ring barking, the removal in winter of a half inch wide strip of wood encircling the trunk taking care not to cut into the cambium layer.
And it takes the bark right off of a tree to the cambium layer.
It is a vascular disease, spread through ground water and its control has, until recently, been considered impossible as the bacteria spreads through a tree's cambium layer.
However, much more secondary tissues (wood and bast) are produced by the Type I wedge with its cambium layer exhibiting two different types of cell division.
Just under the bark of the tree between the xylem and phloem layers is the cambium layer.
In contrast, the Saint Nick's system delivers water directly to the cambium layer of the tree trunk, where it then flows to the tree limbs and needles, Lusk and Cooper said.
As the tree grows, these cells divide and the cambium layer moves outward.
A closer look will show that a lesion has girdled the branch, killing the bark cambium layer and tissues below.
Holes don't harm the tree; the bark is thick, and the holes don't penetrate the cambium layer underneath.