calmative


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sedative

 [sed´ah-tiv]
1. allaying irritability, excitement, or nervousness.
2. an agent that does this. The usual mode of action is depression of the central nervous system, which tends to cause lassitude and reduced mental activity. Sedatives are distinct from tranquilizers, which also have a calming effect but unlike sedatives usually do not suppress bodily reactions. Sedatives may be classified according to the organ most affected, such as cardiac, gastric, and so on. Called also calmative.



The degree of relaxation produced varies with the kind of sedative, the dose, the means of administration, and the mental state of the patient. By causing relaxation, a sedative may help a patient go to sleep, but it does not put him to sleep. Medicines that induce sleep are known as hypnotics (some drugs act as sedatives in small amounts and as hypnotics in large amounts). The barbiturates, such as phenobarbital, are the best known sedatives and are also widely used as hypnotics. Other effective sedatives include paraldehyde and chloral hydrate. Sedatives are useful in the treatment of any condition in which rest and relaxation are important to recovery. Some sedatives are also useful in treatment of convulsive disorders or epilepsy and in counteracting the effect of convulsion-producing drugs. They are used to calm patients before childbirth or surgery. Restlessness in invalids, profound grief in adults, and overexcitement in children can be controlled by medically supervised sedation. Because many sedatives are habit-forming, they should be used with caution.

calm·a·tive

(kahl'mă-tiv),
Calming, quieting; allaying excitement; denoting such an agent.

calmative

(kä′mə-tĭv, kăl′mə-)
adj.
Having relaxing or pacifying properties; sedative.
n.
A sedative.

calmative

[kä′mətiv]
having a calming or quieting effect.
An agent used to control and/or sedate an unruly or hostile group of people, or used in a hostage situation

calm·a·tive

(kawl'mă-tiv)
A substance that produces a sedative or tranquilizing effect.

calmative,

n a substance that gently induces rest.

calmative

1. sedative; allaying excitement.
2. an agent having such effects.
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References in periodicals archive ?
military or law enforcement OOTW's use of calmatives violates cognitive liberty and threatens mental sovereignty.
The Advantages and Limitations of Calmatives for Use As a Non-Lethal Technique examines the viability of using various psychopharmaceutical agents in a number of military and civilian contexts.
This idea, as preposterous as it might sound, is suggested in this government-funded calmatives report.
For fentanyl (a calmative probably used by the Russians to subdue Chechnyan rebels in Moscow in 2002) the index is 300--that is, a fatal dose is 300 times the dose required for incapacitation.
Finally, consider the outcome of the only notable attempt to use a calmative agent against urban guerrillas.
27) In the absence of definitive data, it remains unclear whether calmative agents or the ADS meet or exceed this criterion.
But unlike traditional weapons, neither calmatives nor the ADS can be developed or tested without medical knowledge or the participation of medical personnel.
The development of this new generation of ["nonlethal"] weapons incorporates knowledge from the remarkable advances made in medical science; two examples are calmatives and eye attack lasers.
Calmatives and the ADS are neither designed nor intended to be used as force multipliers; they aim rather at reducing civilian casualties.
Putting aside the question about whether some nonlethal weapons such as calmatives may be lawfully used in armed conflict or law enforcement, (30) the only remaining question is whether nonlethal weapons in general are a just and lawful means to wage war, or whether any medicalized weapons would cause superfluous injury and unnecessary suffering.