calmative


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sedative

 [sed´ah-tiv]
1. allaying irritability, excitement, or nervousness.
2. an agent that does this. The usual mode of action is depression of the central nervous system, which tends to cause lassitude and reduced mental activity. Sedatives are distinct from tranquilizers, which also have a calming effect but unlike sedatives usually do not suppress bodily reactions. Sedatives may be classified according to the organ most affected, such as cardiac, gastric, and so on. Called also calmative.



The degree of relaxation produced varies with the kind of sedative, the dose, the means of administration, and the mental state of the patient. By causing relaxation, a sedative may help a patient go to sleep, but it does not put him to sleep. Medicines that induce sleep are known as hypnotics (some drugs act as sedatives in small amounts and as hypnotics in large amounts). The barbiturates, such as phenobarbital, are the best known sedatives and are also widely used as hypnotics. Other effective sedatives include paraldehyde and chloral hydrate. Sedatives are useful in the treatment of any condition in which rest and relaxation are important to recovery. Some sedatives are also useful in treatment of convulsive disorders or epilepsy and in counteracting the effect of convulsion-producing drugs. They are used to calm patients before childbirth or surgery. Restlessness in invalids, profound grief in adults, and overexcitement in children can be controlled by medically supervised sedation. Because many sedatives are habit-forming, they should be used with caution.

calm·a·tive

(kahl'mă-tiv),
Calming, quieting; allaying excitement; denoting such an agent.

calmative

(kä′mə-tĭv, kăl′mə-)
adj.
Having relaxing or pacifying properties; sedative.
n.
A sedative.

calmative

[kä′mətiv]
having a calming or quieting effect.
An agent used to control and/or sedate an unruly or hostile group of people, or used in a hostage situation

calm·a·tive

(kawl'mă-tiv)
A substance that produces a sedative or tranquilizing effect.

calmative,

n a substance that gently induces rest.

calmative

1. sedative; allaying excitement.
2. an agent having such effects.
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References in periodicals archive ?
By design, kinetic weapons cause blunt trauma, electromagnetic weapons bring searing pain, and calmatives render individuals unconscious.
The counting of the series--"chers chiffres" (Comment c'est 73)--is a solace because a calmative, but hardly the "enchantment"--Beckett's strikingly unbeckettian Proustian borrowing--that Beckett attributes to disruption of the series.
For example, chemical irritants such as CS or pepper spray, traditionally used in situations requiring crowd control, may be replaced by new developments in calmative agents.
One hypothetical scenario for calmative use cited by the Pentagon even involves hungry civilians rioting at a food distribution center.
Calmatives are neurochemical weapons funded by the U.
A piece of verbal ingenuity in The Calmative economically and brilliantly captures the engagement of the narrator's tortuous movement between affirmation and negation with a non-fictional landscape that informs it and locates it.
Other possibilities include ultrasound that causes people to become disoriented and nauseated but leaves no permanent aftereffect; laser rifles that blind people but only temporarily; and calmative agents that can be sprayed on people to make them groggy.
Likewise, the application of chemical substances, such as riot control agents or potential calmative agents, would be barred from use in war by the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention, (25) and their hypothetical use in "military operations other than war" has appropriately been circumscribed as a prudential matter.
The antiseptic, antifungal, curative and calmative properties are just a few reasons why essential oils have been used for centuries in healing treatments, and are being used today by many people who prefer natural, biodegradable remedies that are not harmful to themselves or the earth.
In Iranian traditional medicine; the flowers of ox-tongue are also used by people so as to abate the symptoms of sniffle and common cold, multiplier of blood pressure, calmative and diaphoretic.