callosity


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callus

 [kal´us]
1. localized hyperplasia of the horny layer of the epidermis due to pressure or friction.
2. an unorganized network of woven bone formed about the ends of a broken bone; it is absorbed as repair is completed (provisional callus), and ultimately replaced by true bone (definitive callus).
A fracture with callus formation (arrow) is demonstrated corresponding to the base of the second metatarsal. From Thrall and Ziessman, 2001.

cal·los·i·ty

(ka-los'i-tē),
A circumscribed thickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1)
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]

callosity

/cal·los·i·ty/ (kah-los´ĭ-te) a callus (1).

callosity

(kə-lŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. callosi·ties
1. The condition of being calloused. Also called tylosis.
2. Hardheartedness; insensitivity.
3. See callus.

callosity

See callus, def. 1.

callosity

A bony bump

callosity

A bony bump, callus

cal·los·i·ty

(kă-los'i-tē)
A circumscribedthickening of the keratin layer of the epidermis as a result of repeated friction or intermittent pressure.
Synonym(s): callus (1) , keratoma (1) , poroma (1) , tyloma.
[L. fr. callosus, thick-skinned]

callosity

A protective response of the skin to excessive or prolonged friction or pressure, especially over a bony prominence. A common example is the corn on a toe caused by ill-fitting footwear or by an abnormally positioned toe.

callosity

; mechanically induced hyperkeratosis thickening of stratum corneum in response to localized, intermittent, low-grade mechanical trauma, e.g. friction, shear stress, pressure, tension, often associated with lower-limb/foot pathomechanical faults; increased mechanical skin load causes local dermal inflammation, release of growth factors and increased mitosis of overlying epidermal cells, increased epidermal transit rate and imperfect keratinization; immature keratinocytes reach the outer skin surface and fail to desquamate in the normal manner; affected skin areas show increased thickness and inflexibility of stratum corneum, which increases local mechanical trauma, so hyperkeratosis predisposes to further hyperkeratosis formation (i.e. callosity and corn); long-standing dermal inflammation ultimately causes subdermal fibrosis, reducing local shock absorption and increasing tissue stress of overlying epidermis, and further callus formation; mechanical hyperkeratosis is managed by identification and resolution of its cause (i.e. addressing underlying patho-mechanical or dermatological anomalies), sharp debridement or chemical dissolution of accumulated hyperkeratotic plaques, provision of deflecting or antishear padding, and by use of footwear and orthoses that minimize effects of causative trauma

callosity

a callus.
References in periodicals archive ?
8 cm, fleshy to slightly coriaceous, the base symmetric, cuneate, the apex convex to rounded, the margin revolute, subentire to slightly serrulate, with 8-14 teeth on each side, teeth in one-size class, each tooth with a distal callosity, the adaxial surface lustrous green, glabrous, the abaxial surface pale green, sparsely pubescent, the venation brochidodromous, with five to seven pairs of secondary veins, irregular spaced, excurrent to mid-vein, higher order veins reticulated, submarginal vein present but irregular.
Photographs of callosity patterns and other distinctive body scars allow us to recognize individuals.
I]f that dreary Greenland-wind of benighted Want, perennial from sire to son, had frozen him into a kind of torpor and numb callosity, so that he saw not, felt not, - was this, for a creature with a soul in it, some assuagement; or the cruelest wretchedness of all?
Once Khomeini told a group of visitors, "The callosity on the peasant's palm is the real deed of the land.
The foot must be functional, pain free, plantigrade with good mobility without callosity and does not require to wear modified shoes.