call light


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A bedside button tethered to the wall in a patient’s room, which directs signals the nursing station; a call light usually indicates that the patient has a need or perceived need requiring attention from the nurse on duty

call light

A device used by a patient to signal his or her need for assistance from professional staff. It typically consists of a wireless remote control at the bedside, linked to a beeper, buzzer, cellular phone, chime, or light panel.
See also: light
References in periodicals archive ?
To address these issues, VAPORHCS leaders have encouraged more proactive rounding to address the four P's (positioning, personal needs, pain, placement) and ensure all call lights are functional and within reach.
Additional steps were required to answer call light requests, with additional trips needed to provide the care requested.
That is the way it is in a hospital, and I know this because I am a nurse However, as a patient on the other side of the call light, I just don't want to hear excuses on why I am not getting the attention I deserve the minute I ask for it.
Both the nurse call light tracking and patient movement systems contain digital time-stamped data.
2006) Effects of nursing rounds on patients' call light use, satisfaction and safety.
In turn, the unit experienced positive results, including an increase in patient satisfaction, a reduction in patient falls, fewer hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, as well as decreasing call light use which could improve staff efficiency and give the nurses more time at the bedside.
The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hourly rounding on fall rates, call light usage, and patient satisfaction in an inpatient medical-surgical patient population.
falls, call light usage, medication areas, infection rates) over time.
Doe's history of falls, the staff had already met to review and discuss a plan of care; this included taking her to the bathroom prior to bedtime, performing frequent rounds, ensuring the call light button was within her reach and placing her in a room closer to the nursing station for better observation.
Factors contributing to a patient's overall satisfaction with inpatient hospital care include measures, such as commode assistance, call light placement, and telephone placement (Kerfoot, 2008; Meade et al.
A common understanding is that if a nurse responds to a call light more quickly, the patient may be less likely to fall.
Authors proposed longer nurses' call light response time would lead to a higher probability of falling before a fall actually occurred.