calisthenics

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calisthenics

 [kal″is-then´iks]
systematic exercise for attaining strength and gracefulness.

cal·is·then·ics

(kal'is-then'iks),
Systematic practice of various exercises with the object of preserving health and increasing physical strength.
[G. kalos, beautiful, + sthenos, strength]

calisthenics

[kal′isthen′iks]
a system of exercise in which emphasis is on movements of muscle groups rather than on power and effort. An objective is usually to elevate the heart rate for prolonged periods of time.

cal·is·then·ics

(kal'is-then'iks)
Systematic practice of various exercises with the object of preserving health and increasing physical strength and cardiovascular fitness.
[G. kalos, beautiful, + sthenos, strength]

calisthenics

Physical exercises to build up muscles and improve the efficiency of the heart and lungs.

Calisthenics

Exercise involving free movement without the aid of equipment.
Mentioned in: Exercise
References in periodicals archive ?
Trall, The Illustrated Family Gymnasium, Containing the Most Improved Methods of Applying Gymnastic, Calisthenic, Kinesepathic, and Vocal Exercises to the Development of the Bodily Organs, the Invigoration of their Functions, the Preservation of Health and the Cure of Diseases and Deformities (New York, 1857), 26-27; Elizabeth Powell, instructor for physical training requests a cast of the Venus de Milo for Vassar Gymnasium, 16 Oct.
See, for example, Catharine Beecher, Calisthenic Exercises, in Physiology and Calisthenics, Catharine Beecher (New York, 1856), 20.
A Course of Calisthenics for Young Ladies in Schools and Families with some remarks on Physical Education (Hartford, CT, 1831), 18, 23, 27, 67; "Calisthenic Exercises," Atkinson's Casket, 7 (1832): 186; Mrs.
Some texts were concerned about underdeveloped or weak lungs Beecher, Calisthenic Exercises, 11; Phelps, The Educator, 110; Lewis, Treasury, 267.
Beecher, Calisthenic Exercises, 11, 12; Dio Lewis, Treasury, 267.
Beecher, Calisthenic Exercises, 12, 52); "First Arm Position: Arms Up
Beecher, Calisthenic Exercises, 11, 13; Beecher, Physiology and Calisthenics, 192; Report of the Department of Physical Training, 17 June 1867, Archives and Special Collections, Vassar College.
85; Child, 249; Beecher, Calisthenic Exercises, 41; Fitzgerald, 249; Dio Lewis, "Mistakes in Gymnastics," Lewis' New Gymnastics for Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children and Boston Journal of Physical Culture (1860): no.
80-81; Beecher, Physiology and Calisthenics, iii-iv, 12; Beecher, Calisthenic Exercises, 9-10; Letter from Love Brown to Helen, Normal Institute for Physical Culture, 11 August 1866, Mount Holyoke Alumnae; Lewis, "The New Gymnastics," 131; Powell, "Physical Culture," 134.
The aerobic conditioning era started with dance-oriented exercise, which evolved to high-impact calisthenics and then all low-impact and high/low combos, joined by step and now funk.
Each and every exercise, calisthenic or dance movement you include in your workout should have sufficient physiological value and be safe enough to be included for the general workout population.
In an exercise class, the calisthenic portion consists of exercises to strenthen and tone different muscle groups.