calcific tendinitis

(redirected from calcific tendinopathy)

calcific tendinitis

Etymology: L, calx, lime, facere, to make, tendo, tendon; Gk, itis, inflammation
a chronic inflammation of a tendon resulting from an accumulation of calcium deposits in the tissue.

calcific tendinitis

Inflammation of a tendon accompanied by focal calcium deposits, especially common in the supraspinatus tendon of shoulder joint.

Clinical findings
Pain, decreased range of motion.

Management
Diet—calcium restriction, magnesium supplementation; extracorporeal shock wave therapy; analgesics/NSAIDs; physical therapy—electroanalgesia, ice therapy, heat; ultrasound (uncertain efficacy), iontophoresis (uncertain efficacy), injections, needling and lavage (75% response rate); corticosteroid injections (useful if shoulder is acutely inflamed); removal of deposits by open or arthroscopic procedures yields a 90% response rate.

cal·cif·ic ten·din·i·tis

(kal-sif'ik ten'din-ī'tis)
Chronic tendinitis with formation of mineral deposits in and around the tendon.

calcific tendinitis

An inflammatory disorder of the rotator cuff tendons involving calcification most commonly close to the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. About half of those with the disorder suffer shoulder pain and limitation of movement at the shoulder. The condition is self-limiting but recovery can be hastened by ultrasound treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Calcific tendinopathy is a common disorder of the rotator cuff and is probably linked to hypoxia of the tissues.
We evaluated the clinical outcome of patients with chronic calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff.
Patients were included in the study if they had a calcific tendinopathy diagnosed on clinical grounds, no episodes of shoulder instability, no radiographic signs of fracture of the glenoid or the greater or lesser tuberosity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of calcific tendinopathy, a duration of symptoms of at least 5 months, an inadequate response to nonoperative management (including nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and rest), and calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff found at the time of surgery.
This study shows that in patients with calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff, complete removal of the deposit produces better results than partial removal.
Some investigators suggest acromioplasty as only a treatment for calcific tendinopathy, or as an important procedure for deposit removal.