multiple synostosis syndrome

(redirected from calcaneonavicular coalition)

multiple synostosis syndrome

A rare condition (OMIM:186400) characterised by carpal and tarsal synostoses (carpal and tarsal coalition), radial-head subluxation, aplasia or hypoplasia of middle phalanges, and metacarpophalangeal synostoses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another recent investigation by Lysack and Fenton, which intended to evaluate radiographic variations in calcaneonavicular morphology, incidentally noted a general prevalence of calcaneonavicular coalition to be 5.
The "anteater nose": a direct sign of calcaneonavicular coalition on the lateral radiograph.
Calcaneonavicular coalition treated by resection and interposition of the extensor digitorum brevis muscle.
Features of calcaneonavicular coalition on coronal computed tomography.
The calcaneonavicular coalitions were roughly evenly divided between the cartilaginous (56%) and fibrous (44%) subtypes, without any osseous coalitions being identified.
Secondary signs evaluated for calcaneonavicular coalitions were similar to those utilized in plain radiographic evaluation: blunted or flat anterior calcaneal process (10) (Figs.
3% (8/78) of the calcaneonavicular coalitions demonstrated the well-known "anteater" sign, while 24.
10,22,24,25) Calcaneonavicular coalitions ossify earlier and become symptomatic around 8 to 12 years of age.
We also found that calcaneonavicular coalitions are far more common than subtalar coalitions (approximately a 3:1 ratio in both the retrospective and prospective portions of the study), and that calcaneonavicular coalitions tend to be overwhelmingly nonosseous, while there is a more even distribution of histologic subtype for subtalar coalitions.
It is unclear if the these "coalition-like" appearances correlate at all to the morphologic types 2 and 3 described by Lysack and Fenton (35) on medial oblique radiographs of the ankle, although these investigators claimed that those morphologic types corresponded to cartilaginous and fibrous calcaneonavicular coalitions.
Although it is uncommon for an os calcaneus secundarius to cause symptoms, range of motion of the subtalar joint may be limited by the ossicle, clinically resembling a calcaneonavicular coalition.
5,6) Calcaneonavicular coalition (Figure 4) is the most common of the tarsal coalitions.