calamus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to calamus: calamus oil

cal·a·mus

(kal'ă-mŭs),
1. The dried, unpeeled rhizome of Acorus calamus (family Araceae), cultivated in Myanmar (Burma) and Sri Lanka, a carminative and anthelmintic.
2. A reed-shaped structure.
[L. reed, a pen]

calamus

/cal·a·mus/ (kal´ah-mus) a reed or reedlike structure.
calamus scripto´rius  the lowest portion of the floor of the fourth ventricle, situated between the restiform bodies.

calamus

(kăl′ə-məs)
n. pl. cala·mi (-mī′)
1.
b. The aromatic rhizome of the sweet flag, used for medicinal purposes and yielding an oil used in perfumery.
2. Any of various chiefly tropical Asian climbing palms of the genus Calamus, having strong flexible stems used as a source of rattan.
3. See quill.

sweet flag

A perennial herb, the rhizone of which contains mucilage, sesquiterpenes and volatile oils (azulene, camphor, cineole, eugenol, pinene and others); it is carminative, spasmolytic and mildly sedative.

Chinese medicine
In traditional Chinese medicine, sweet flag has been used for deafness, seizures and vertigo.

Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, sweet flag has been used for fever, gastrointestinal complaints (dyspepsia and flatulence), menstrual disorders, toothache and tobacco addiction.
 
Toxicity
Aserone, one of sweet flag’s volatile oils, is carcinogenic; the FDA has classified sweet flag as “unsafe”.

cal·a·mus

(kal'ă-mŭs)
A reed-shaped structure.
[L. reed, a pen]

calamus

  1. the quill of a feather.
  2. any hollow, nodeless stem.

calamus

in the shape of a reed or pen.

calamus scriptorius
reed-shaped portion of the floor of the fourth ventricle of the brain situated between the restiform bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The genus name, Acorus is derived from Acoron (coreon = the pupil of the eye) and the species calamus is derived from the Greek word, Calamos (a reed).
Compositional variations and anthelmintic activity of essential oils from rhizomes of different wild populations of Acorus calamus L.
For classification as POS, feather alterations in white-tailed sea eagles had to meet 6 or more of the following criteria: 1) loss of all or most flight and tail feathers and eventually covert feathers during the nestling or fledgling period (Fig 1); 2) longitudinal splitting or deformation of the rachis of the primary or secondary feathers and retrices (Fig 2b); 3) excessive keratin deposition on the ventral side of the rachis (Fig 2c); 4) extremely shortened primary and secondary feathers and retrices, including the calamus (Fig 3); 5) curved appearance of the primary and secondary feathers and retrices; 6) replacement of lost abnormal flight and tail feathers by new abnormal feathers; 7) new feathers easily removable; and 8) constriction of the distal part of the calamus.
till in the air there comes the smell of calamus from wet, gummy stalks.
Taxa with both types of fibers in the same eophyll are rare (Livistona, Borassus, Calamus, Mauritia, Oraniopsis, and Jubaea).
Among the most commonly utilized botanicals for that particular function were saffron, sweet rush, calamus, gentian, quinine, centaury, rosemary, caraway, hyssop, sage, absinthe, aniseed, mint and rhubarb.
The incense was made by blending together equal amounts of frankincense, stacte, onycha and galbanum (another resinous shrub), while the oil required 16 pounds of myrrh with the same amount of cassia and half as much each of cinnamon and calamus.
Greg Weiser, Jeffrey Elie, Scott Panzer and Barbara Calamus all of Newmark & Company Real Estate, always hard at work.
While at the recent Tea and Coffee World Cup in Amsterdam, Jane Pettigrew met Nemira Liaugaudaite and Gracijus Ivanauskas of the Lithuanian Acorus Calamus tea company.
Calamus Renascens: Revista de humanismo y tradicidn clasica.
Aquatics surrounding a wild pond will include hottonia palustris (water violet) and acorus calamus (sweet flag).