withdrawal

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withdrawal

 [with-draw´al]
1. a pathological retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement, as may occur in avoidant, schizoid, or schizotypal personality disorders.
2. the removal of something.
3. a substance-specific substance-induced disorder that follows the cessation of use or reduction in intake of a psychoactive substance that had been regularly used to induce a state of intoxication. Specific withdrawal syndromes include those for alcohol, amphetamines or similarly acting sympathomimetics, cocaine, nicotine, opioids, and sedatives, hypnotics, or antianxiety agents. Called also abstinence syndrome, withdrawal symptoms, and withdrawal syndrome.



The usual reactions to alcohol withdrawal are anxiety, weakness, gastrointestinal symptoms, nausea and vomiting, tremor, fever, rapid heartbeat, convulsions, and delirium (see also delirium tremens). Similar effects are produced by withdrawal of barbiturates and in this case convulsions occur frequently, often followed by psychosis with hallucinations. Treatment of withdrawal consists of providing a substitute drug such as a mild sedative, along with treatment of the symptoms as needed. Parenteral fluids are often required.
substance withdrawal withdrawal (def. 3).
withdrawal syndrome former name for withdrawal (def. 3).
thought withdrawal the delusion that someone or something is removing thoughts from one's mind.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl),
1. The act of removal or retreat.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
2. A psychological and/or physical syndrome caused by the abrupt cessation of the use of a drug in an habituated person.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
3. The therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug to avoid the symptoms of withdrawal (2).
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
4. A pattern of behavior observed in schizophrenia and depression, characterized by a pathologic retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement and leading to self-preoccupation.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.

withdrawal

/with·draw·al/ (with-drawl´)
1. pathological retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement.

substance withdrawal  a substance-specific mental disorder that follows the cessation of use or reduction in intake of a psychoactive substance that had been regularly used to induce a state of intoxication.

withdrawal

(wĭth-drô′əl, wĭth-)
n.
1.
a. Discontinuance of the use of a drug or other substance, especially one that is addictive.
b. The physiological and mental reaction to such discontinuance, often characterized by distressing symptoms: is going through withdrawal from opioids.
2. Coitus interruptus.

withdrawal

[withdrô′əl]
Etymology: ME, with + drawen, to take away
a common response to physical danger or severe stress characterized by a state of apathy, lethargy, depression, retreat into oneself, and in grave cases, catatonia and stupor. It is pathological if it interferes with a person's perception of reality and ability to function in society, such as in the various forms of schizophrenia. See also schizophrenia.

withdrawal

The participant-/subject-/patient-initiated act of ending participation in a clinical study, which can range from complete withdrawal from study procedures and follow-up to withdrawal from study-related interventions, while permitting continued access to his or her medical records or identifiable information.

Per FDA regulations, when a subject withdraws from a study, the data collected on the subject to the point of withdrawal remain part of the study database and may not be removed.

withdrawal

Psychology A retreat from interpersonal contact, which may be a normal reaction–eg, to uncomfortable social situations or unemployment, or a sign of mental disorders–eg, schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder Substance abuse A specific constellation of signs and Sx due to the abrupt cessation of, or reduction in, regularly administered opioids; opioid withdrawal is characterized by 3 or more of the following Sx that develop within hrs to several days after abrupt cessation of the substance:
1. Dysphoric mood,.
2. N&V,.
3. muscle aches & abdominal cramps,.
4. lacrimation or rhinorrhea,.
5. pupillary dilation, piloerection or sweating,.
6. diarrhea,.
7. yawning,.
8. fever,.
9. insomnia. See Alcohol withdrawal syndrome, Physical dependence.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl)
1. The act of removal or retreat.
2. A psychological and physical syndrome caused by the abrupt cessation of the use of a drug in a habituated person.
3. The therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug so as to avoid withdrawal (2).
4. A pattern of behavior observed in schizophrenia and depression, characterized by a pathologic retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement and leading to self-preoccupation.
5. Synonym(s): coitus interruptus.

Withdrawal

Those side effects experienced by a person who has become physically dependent on a substance, upon decreasing the substance's dosage or discontinuing its use.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl)
1. Act of removal or retreat.
2. Psychological and/or physical syndrome caused by abrupt cessation of use of a drug in an habituated person.
3. Therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug to avoid the symptoms of withdrawal.

withdrawal (abstinence) syndrome,

n the somatic and psychosomatic symptoms recognizable after the abrupt termination of regular drug or other substance use. The types of symptoms are specific to the type of the withdrawn substance.

withdrawal

pharmaceutically speaking, cessation of treatment with a particular drug.

withdrawal reflex
see flexor reflex.
withdrawal time
time interval after cessation of treatment before the animal or any of its products can be used as human food. Based on determination of the time interval required for tissue levels of the substance to fall below critical levels as decreed by legislation. Called also withholding period.

Patient discussion about withdrawal

Q. ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL what are the symtoms of it?

A. thank you dagmar--i hope this answer will help people to understand what this drug can do to you---peace---mrfoot56

Q. I may be healthier now, but miserable… I’ve not been smoking for a whole month (my longest period in the last decade), and I do feel a bit better physically, but it seems that I lost the joy of life – I don’t go out with my friends any more (because they’re all smokers), I envy other smokers, and generally I feel nervous and dull. Will it be like that forever or is there hope?

A. Well, try to think about what are you missing? The foul smell? The yellow teeth? The feeling of suffocating next morning? Whenever you feel longing to cigarettes, try to think again why you stopped smoking- and it’d help you to keep with it.

More discussions about withdrawal
References in periodicals archive ?
Coffee drinkers who chose not to ingest caffeine the day of surgery, defined by the researchers as "at risk" for caffeine withdrawal, had fewer headaches if they received an intravenous dose of caffeine during recovery equal to two cups of coffee.
Mayo Clinic researchers recently reported that an intravenous dose of caffeine before or after outpatient surgery may eliminate or significantly reduce the likelihood of caffeine withdrawal headaches among patients who regularly consume caffeine.
As a background for the study, the doctors stated that "People who stop consuming caffeine may have symptoms, but severity and incidence of caffeine withdrawal are not known.
Eight to 11 percent showed signs of depression and anxiety on those days -- symptoms that have not previously been associated with caffeine withdrawal, Griffiths says.
Caffeine withdrawal headaches are an indicator of caffeine dependence (Ray & Ksir, 1990).
Caffeine withdrawal THESE are triggered by a lack of caffeine, usually at weekends, in coffee drinkers.
I drank hot water at my desk at work, but it wasn't the same, and by midday on day two, I had terrible headaches which were essentially caused by caffeine withdrawal.
Many professionals support caffeine withdrawal as a tinnitus therapy, even though there is a lack of any relevant evidence, and, in fact, acute symptoms of caffeine withdrawal might even make tinnitus worse," she added.
Three months after 12 women with moderate to severe breast pain that had failed to respond to mild painkillers or caffeine withdrawal were supplemented with 150,000 IU of vitamin A daily, 9 of them had marked pain reduction; and, in 5, breast masses decreased at least 50%.
After chatting to colleagues I discover it's probably due to caffeine withdrawal which cheers me up a little bit - it means the diet is having a positive effect on my health even though I feel grotty.