cafeteria diet

cafeteria diet

An experimental system for studying obesity that allows rats free, “cafeteria-style” access to cookies, candy, cake (”junk-food”).
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The cafeteria diet consisted of sliced white bread (Karavaj, Russia), crushed chocolate (N.
Groups 2-5 were given the basal solid pellets with the addition of the cafeteria diet (total energy value 133.
In this study, obesity was induced in normal rats via the feeding of a cafeteria diet for 23 days.
Between days 14 and 23 of the cafeteria diet, the control animals had significantly higher glucose levels at 60 and 120 min after the glucose load.
In rats fed ascorbic acid, vitamin C "was able to protect against high-fat-diet effects, reducing the increase of body weight, total body fat, and enlargement of different adipose deposits induced by the cafeteria diet," the researchers concluded.
The younger students never noticed the fat calorie percentage in their cafeteria diet shrinking from 38 percent to 28 percent over the past school year.
The cafeteria diet induced an average weight difference of 32 g and an overall increase in body weight in the experimental groups occurred at a significantly slower rate than the control groups, irrespective of diet.
Rats assigned to the obese groups were fed on a cafeteria diet (15% protein, 68% carbohydrates and 17% fat) over a period of eight weeks to effect DIO, while lean rats were fed on standard chow (Epol, Pretoria, South Africa) (18% protein, 41.
0001), irrespective of diet or treatment, while the cafeteria diet induced an average weight difference of 31.
The lean rats were fed rat chow and the obese rats were fed on a cafeteria diet as described by Mnonopi et al.
A cafeteria diet was selected to mimic the common practises of a Western style diet which is rich in carbohydrates and fats, leading to hyperphagia and weight gain.
M also has been found to significantly reduce TNF-cx plasma levels in cafeteria diet inducedobesity (Mnonopi et al.