caduceus


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caduceus

 [kah-du´se-us]
the wand of Hermes or Mercury; used as a symbol of the medical profession and as the emblem of the Medical Corps of the U.S. Army. Another symbol of medicine is the staff of Aesculapius, which is the official insignia of the American Medical Association.
Caduceus.

ca·du·ce·us

(kă-dū'sē-ŭs),
A staff with two oppositely twined serpents and surmounted by two wings; emblem of the U S Army Medical Corps. For veterinary medicine, the double serpent was changed in 1972 to its present form, with a single serpent.
See also: staff of Aesculapius.
[L. the staff of Mercury; G. kēryx herald, the staff of Hermes]

caduceus

/ca·du·ce·us/ (kah-doo´shus) [L.] the wand of Hermes or Mercury; used as a symbol of the medical profession and as the emblem of the Medical Corps of the U.S. Army. See also staff of Aesculapius.
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Caduceus. (A), United States Army Medical Corps; (B), American Veterinary Medicine Association.

caduceus

(kə-do͞o′sē-əs, -shəs, -dyo͞o′-)
n. pl. cadu·cei (-sē-ī′)
1.
a. A herald's wand or staff, especially in ancient times.
b. Greek Mythology A winged staff with two serpents twined around it, carried by Hermes.
2. An insignia modeled on Hermes's staff and used as the symbol of the medical profession.

ca·du′ce·an (-sē-ən, -shən) adj.

caduceus

[kədo̅o̅′sē·əs]
Etymology: L; Gk, karykeion, herald
the wand of the god Hermes or Mercury, used as the symbol for the U.S. Army Medical Corps. It is represented as a staff with two serpents coiled around it and is often confused with the staff of Ӕsculapius, a rod with one snake entwined about it.

caduceus

A time-honoured symbol used (incorrectly) by various groups for medicine and the healing arts. The caduceus is a hybrid of the staff of Hermes/Mercury, messenger of the gods, and two serpents in a coital position, representing fertility. It was originally intended as a symbol of commerce and trade, but in the 16th century, German printer Johannes Froben used it on the cover of a number of medical texts; in the 19th century, possibly through inadequate scholastic diligence, the US Army Medical Corps and US Marine Hospital Service and the Public Health Service adopted the caduceus as the symbol of choice.

caduceus

Medical history The time-honored, yet incorrect, symbol of medicine and art of healing, depicted by two serpents coiled around a winged staff. Cf Æsculapian staff.

ca·du·ce·us

(kă-dū'sē-ŭs)
A staff with two oppositely twined serpents and surmounted by two wings; emblem of the U.S. Army Medical Corps.
See also: staff of Aesculapius
[L. the staff of Mercury; G. kēryx herald, the staff of Hermes]

caduceus

An emblem or symbol consisting of the winged staff of Mercury around which two serpents are entwined in opposite directions. The caduceus appears on the cap badges of members of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) and is the emblem of the American Army Medical Corps.

Caduceus

The ancient and universal symbol of medicine consisting of the winged staff of Mercury and two intertwining serpents.
Mentioned in: Polarity Therapy

caduceus

the wand of Hermes or Mercury consisting of a winged staff with two serpents entwined; used as a symbol of the medical profession and as the emblem of most military Medical Corps. Another symbol of medicine is the staff of Æsculapius, which is the official insignia of the American Medical Association. The American Veterinary Medical Association uses a modification of the caduceus as an emblem. The staff is unwinged, there is a single serpent instead of two, and a large V is imprinted over the whole.
An adaptation of the caduceus, with only one snake winding itself around the staff is the emblem of the Veterinary Corps of the US Army.
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