cadmium

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cadmium

 (Cd) [kad´me-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 48. (See Appendix 6.) Inhalation of cadmium fumes causes pulmonary edema with proliferative interstitial pneumonia and various degrees of lung damage. Cadmium poisoning may occur due to occupational exposure, smoking, and ingestion of certain foods (kidneys and livers; seafoods such as mussels, oysters, and crabs; and some grains). Maternal cadmium exposure can cause abnormal embryonic development by interfering with normal zinc ion metabolic activities.

cad·mi·um (Cd),

(kad'mē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently used in the basic sciences. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

/cad·mi·um/ (Cd) (kad´me-um) a chemical element, at. no. 48. Cadmium and its salts are poisonous; inhalation of cadmium fumes or dust causes pneumoconiosis, and ingestion of foods contaminated by cadmium-plated containers causes violent gastrointestinal symptoms.

cadmium (Cd)

[kad′mē·əm]
(Cd)
Etymology: Gk, kadmeia, zinc ore
, a metallic bluish white element that resembles tin. Its atomic number is 48; its atomic mass is 112.40. Cadmium has many uses in industry and was formerly included in medications. Such medications have been replaced by less toxic drugs. See also cadmium poisoning.

cadmium

A toxic divalent metallic element (atomic number 48, atomic weight 112.411), which is ubiquitous in nature and central to many industrial processes. Most cadmium is used for rechargeable batteries; it is also used in electroplating, nuclear fission, TV tubes, photocopier drums and paint pigments (yellow and red). It has no known physiologic role in higher animals.

Ref range
0–5.0 µg/L.
 
Toxic range
> 100 µg/L.

cad·mi·um

(Cd) (kad'mē-ŭm)
A metallicelement, atomic no. 48, atomic wt. 112.411; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine. Various compounds of cadmium are used commercially in fields such as metallurgy, photography, and electrochemistry; a few have been used as ascaricides, antiseptics, and fungicides.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium

A poisonous metal sometimes encountered as an air pollutant in industrial processes. Inhaled cadmium dust can cause lung inflammation. Cadmium is also damaging to the kidneys and can cause softening of the bones (OSTEOMALACIA).

cadmium,

n a toxic metal that is found in cigarette smoke, industrial waste, paints, and plastics. Exposure has been linked to cancer, hypertension, and lowered activity of specific enzymes.
cadmium iodatum (kadˑ·mē·m ī·ō·dāˑ·tm),
n a homeopathic preparation of cadmium used to alleviate the symptoms associated with radiation treatments.
cadmium sulphuricum (kadˑ·mē·m sl·fyurˑ·i·km),
n a homeopathic preparation of cadmium used to alleviate facial paralysis, Bell's palsy, nausea, vomiting, and the symptoms associated with chemotherapy.

cad·mi·um

(kad'mē-ŭm)
Metallic element; its salts are poisonous and little used in medicine but are frequently employed in the basic sciences.
[L. cadmia, fr. G. kadmeia or kadmia, an ore of zinc, calamine]

cadmium (Cd) (kad´mēəm),

n a bluish-white metallic element that resembles tin. Cadmium bromide, used in engraving, lithography, and photography, can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested.

cadmium

chemical element, atomic number 48, symbol Cd; its salts are poisonous. See Table 6. Poisoning in animals may be caused by aerial pollution of pastures or by accidental ingestion of fungicides or anthelmintics which contain the element. Nephropathy, anemia, bone demineralization and poor hair, skin and hoof growth result.

cadmium anthranilate
no longer widely used as an anthelmintic for pigs because of its toxicity.
cadmium chloride
causes bleaching of teeth, anemia, cardiac hypertrophy and bone marrow hyperplasia.
cadmium oxide
a toxic compound used at one time as an anthelmintic for pigs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Organic substitutes simply cannot achieve the level of opacity cadmium colorants can, users and suppliers say.
And ifs probably those customers, color industry insiders say, that will dictate the future of cadmium.
The industry itself is moving to replace the use of cadmium wherever it can.
injection molder of nylon toggle, rocker and paddle switches for appliances, business machines, marine and automotive applications, recently changed from cadmium and lead concentrates to Reed's non-heavy-metal alternatives.
What we may see if cadmium is banned is a lot of [compounders] going out of business.
These suppliers have chosen to continue making cadmium pigments, devising methods to reduce soluble or extractable cadmium levels to almost nothing.
Jewelers and enamelers brave far greater cadmium risks than painters, he adds: "The major concern is soldering with low-melting silver solders that contain about 20 to 30 percent cadmium.
Yet Luke contends the bill could place cadmium pigments beyond the reach of most artists even if it did contain an artists' exemption.
Last February, for instance, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration published a 95-page report summarizing the history of cadmium regulation, studies of health problems linked to the heavy metal, and risk calculations for cancer, kidney damage and other disorders.
The trouble with a lot of regulations is that they'll take a substance -- say, cadmium -- and treat all forms of its the same," argues J.
Other environmenalists contend that granting an exemption to artists would encourage more cadmium users to press for their own exemptions, ultimately resulting in ineffective regulation of cadmium-containing waste.
Cadmium atoms, when bound to sulfur and selenium, serve as a fount of color and aesthetic possibility.