cadence

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Related to cadences: plagal cadence

cadence

[kā′dəns]
Etymology: L, cadere, to fall
a rhythm, as in voice, music, or movement.
The beat or timing of a particular rhythmic activity—e.g., the rhythm of pedalling in cycling

cadence

number of steps per minute during normal gait

cadence

the rhythm of a horse's gait. The walk is a four beat cadence, the trot is two beat, the canter has three beats and the gallop has four.
References in classic literature ?
The Canadian waters are vocal with these little French chansons, that have been echoed from mouth to mouth and transmitted from father to son, from the earliest days of the colony; and it has a pleasing effect, in a still golden summer evening, to see a batteau gliding across the bosom of a lake and dipping its oars to the cadence of these quaint old ditties, or sweeping along in full chorus on a bright sunny morning, down the transparent current of one of the Canada rivers.
cried Newman, in a tone absolutely naif from its pleading and caressing cadence.
And from behind my shoulder, in the silvery cadence of that dear voice, rose the brave battle anthem of Helium which the nation's women sing as their men march out to victory.
There was a melancholy cadence in Dorothea's voice as she spoke these last words.
Their technic consisted in waving their tails and moving their heads in a regular succession of measured movements resulting in a cadence which evidently pleased the eye of the Mahar as the cadence of our own instrumental music pleases our ears.
Behind them came La, swaying too; but not in unison with the chanted cadence.
The beating of the drum was in a slow, ponderous cadence, at first without time but presently settling into a heavy rhythm to which the apes kept time with measured tread and swaying bodies.
Presently those about Tarzan began to dance to the cadence of their solemn song.
But the doors were closed again at once, and Vronsky did not hear the end of the phrase and the cadence of the accompaniment, though he knew from the thunder of applause that it was over.