cadaverine


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Related to cadaverine: putrescine

cadaverine

 [kah-dav´er-in]
a relatively nontoxic ptomaine, C5H14N2, formed by decarboxylation of lysine; it is sometimes one of the products of Vibrio proteus and of V. cholerae, and occasionally found in the urine in cystinuria, where it causes an unpleasant odor.

ca·dav·er·ine

(kă-dav'er-in),
1,5-pentanediamine; 1,5-diaminopentane; a foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine; poisonous and irritating to the skin; found in decaying meat and fish.

cadaverine

/ca·dav·er·ine/ (-in) a foul-smelling nitrogenous base, pentamethylenediamine, produced by decarboxylation of lysine. It is produced in decaying protein material by the action of bacteria, particularly species of Vibrio.

cadaverine

(kə-dăv′ə-rēn′)
n.
A syrupy, colorless, foul-smelling polyamine, C5H14N2, produced in decaying animal tissue by the decarboxylation of lysine.

ca·dav·er·ine

(kă-dav'ĕr-in)
A foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine; poisonous and irritating to the skin.

cadaverine

An AMINE found in decomposing body tissue.

ca·dav·er·ine

(kă-dav'ĕr-in)
A foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine; poisonous and irritating to the skin.

cadaverine (kədav´ərēn´),

n a foul-smelling diamine formed by bacterial decarboxylation of lysine. It is poisonous and irritating to the skin.

cadaverine

a relatively nontoxic ptomaine, C5H14N2, formed by decarboxylation of lysine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: bacillus, aciduric, effervescence, spore-formers, lysine decarboxylase, cadaverine.
The activity of the lysine decarboxylase enzyme produced by bacteria results in breakdown of lysine and the formation of cadaverine with liberation of C[O.
Determination of Potential Inhibitor Effect on Lysine Decarboxylase Activity by Cadaverine
The bacteria that cause the condition produce organic byproducts with such telling, if unsavory, names as putrescine and cadaverine.
The surprise, Decker says, is that the known antioxidants that they expected to be protective-compounds with such unappetizing names as putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, and spermadine-accounted for only a small fraction of the effect.
In vitro formation of piperidine, cadaverine and pipecolic acid in chick and mouse brain during development.