cadaveric donor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to cadaveric donor: cadaveric transplant

donor

 [do´ner]
1. a person or organism that supplies an organ or tissue to be used in another body, usually either a cadaveric, living related, or living unrelated donor; see transplantation.
2. a substance or compound that contributes part of itself to another substance (acceptor).
Algorithm for organ donation. From McQuillan, 2002.
cadaveric donor an organ or tissue donor who has already died; see cadaveric donor transplantation.
living nonrelated donor living unrelated donor.
living related donor one who is a close blood relative of the recipient; see living related donor transplantation.
living unrelated donor one who is not a close blood relative of the recipient; see living unrelated donor transplantation.
non–heart beating cadaveric donor a donor who has been pronounced dead according to the traditional criteria of lack of any pulse or detectable cardiac activity, but is not yet brain dead (see brain death). There are two types: The controlled donor is a person in a vegetative state who has signed a consent form or otherwise stated his or her wishes before becoming ill. Based on the patient's stated wishes and at the request of the next-of-kin, cannulas are placed into blood vessels for postmortem cooling of organs and the person is removed from life support. Once death has been declared, the organs are rapidly perfused with cold preservative solution and surgically removed. The uncontrolled donor is a person declared dead because of catastrophic injury to the heart, such as a gunshot wound to the heart. Cannulas are placed into blood vessels after death and the organs are perfused and removed. This also requires consent of next-of-kin.
universal donor a person whose blood is type O in the ABO blood group system; such blood is sometimes used in emergency transfusion. Transfusion of blood cells rather than whole blood is preferred.

cadaveric donor

an organ or tissue donor who has already died. See also cadaveric donor transplantation.

cadaveric donor

One who donates an organ or tissue after his or her death.
See also: donor
References in periodicals archive ?
In a recent study, graft survival was significantly lower when cadaveric donors over 55 years had hypertension for over 10 years and a creatinine clearance of less than 80 mL/min (Transplantation 70[5]: 765-71, 2000).
We have the facilities, but what we are lacking is the organs, which is why we are encouraging people to donate, and we are also especially looking for more cadaveric donors," Dr Rashid mentioned.
The approved draft contained 10 articles that dealt with the administrative and financial matters of SCOT, its functions in harvesting kidneys from living and cadaveric donors, transplanting them and procedures for post-surgical treatment in various health facilities in the Kingdom.
Additionally, the AMA recently urged Congress to amend the NOTA of 1984 to allow for pilot studies with financial compensation for families of cadaveric donors as a means to reduce the shortage of organs available for transplant (PR Newswire, 2008).
Moreover islet transplantation requires at least two donor organs for each recipient and therefore its broad application remains limited due to lack of sufficient cadaveric donors.
The Sydney University Group needed the co-operation of other interested parties to find and provide the cadaveric donors across NSW to make it viable.
Even now, with the advances in medical technology and immunosuppression, live donation (again, especially for kidneys, but also for segments of liver, pancreata, lung, small bowel and in some exceptional cases even for heart (2)), is considered to be a better option than related transplant from cadaveric donors, with statistics indicating better recipient survival rates and better graft survival.
Puzzlingly, some of the staunchest critics of using financial incentives for cadaveric donors have openly supported expanded use of living donor exchanges.
The supply of cadaveric donors is at best plateauing and at worse decreasing, which in some ways is a good thing because it means fewer people are dying in road accidents, which is how most organs become available," he said.
The first part deals with the Intensive Care Management of the Liver Transplant Recipient, factors involved with extended criteria cadaveric donors, acute liver failure and cardiovascular and coagulation issues in end-stage liver patients requiring transplantation.
First, suitable cadaveric donors must be identified in a timely fashion.