cadaveric donor


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Related to cadaveric donor: cadaveric transplant

donor

 [do´ner]
1. a person or organism that supplies an organ or tissue to be used in another body, usually either a cadaveric, living related, or living unrelated donor; see transplantation.
2. a substance or compound that contributes part of itself to another substance (acceptor).
Algorithm for organ donation. From McQuillan, 2002.
cadaveric donor an organ or tissue donor who has already died; see cadaveric donor transplantation.
living nonrelated donor living unrelated donor.
living related donor one who is a close blood relative of the recipient; see living related donor transplantation.
living unrelated donor one who is not a close blood relative of the recipient; see living unrelated donor transplantation.
non–heart beating cadaveric donor a donor who has been pronounced dead according to the traditional criteria of lack of any pulse or detectable cardiac activity, but is not yet brain dead (see brain death). There are two types: The controlled donor is a person in a vegetative state who has signed a consent form or otherwise stated his or her wishes before becoming ill. Based on the patient's stated wishes and at the request of the next-of-kin, cannulas are placed into blood vessels for postmortem cooling of organs and the person is removed from life support. Once death has been declared, the organs are rapidly perfused with cold preservative solution and surgically removed. The uncontrolled donor is a person declared dead because of catastrophic injury to the heart, such as a gunshot wound to the heart. Cannulas are placed into blood vessels after death and the organs are perfused and removed. This also requires consent of next-of-kin.
universal donor a person whose blood is type O in the ABO blood group system; such blood is sometimes used in emergency transfusion. Transfusion of blood cells rather than whole blood is preferred.

cadaveric donor

an organ or tissue donor who has already died. See also cadaveric donor transplantation.

cadaveric donor

One who donates an organ or tissue after his or her death.
See also: donor
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Feldstein (2003) discusses (in addition to the policies discussed in this paper) a policy of compensating cadaveric donors before death through lower insurance premiums for automobile insurance.
Thus, properly defined, there does appear to be a sufficiently large supply of potential cadaveric donors to resolve the shortage fully--that is, to stop adding to the waiting lists.
34) UNOS data for 2001 indicate that, on average, cadaveric donors yield 1.
32) Moreover, the current approach alone is unlikely to reach the levels of success enjoyed in the countries Ontario has sought to emulate because our age demographics and mortality patterns are less conducive to high rates of potential cadaveric donors.
Some of these methods might relate to OPO practices and cadaveric donors (e.
However, he pointed out that their families also should cooperate with the authorities to harvest the organs from live or cadaveric donors.
Often with cadaveric donors, a Carrel patch (small portion of surrounding aorta) is acquired and anastomosed to the recipient external iliac artery in an end-to-side fashion.
It is also intended for use to screen organ donors when serum and plasma specimens are obtained while the donor's heart is still beating and in testing blood specimens to screen cadaveric donors.
It will primarily allow more kidney transplants - from both live and cadaveric donors - to be carried out in Wales.
Furthermore, there are clearly issues involved with living donors not present with cadaveric donors.
said the large increase in living donation is the result of progress in the field of transplantation combined with the relative shortage of cadaveric donors.