bystander CPR

bystander CPR

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that is performed by a layperson who is not part of the organized emergency-response system in a community. Such a person is known as a CPR bystander. Since most cardiac arrests occur outside health care institutions, bystander CPR is an essential part of the chain of survival.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bystander CPR is the only answer in out of hospital cardiac arrest.
Only 46% of people who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest receive bystander CPR before professional help arrives," relates Clifton Callaway, a volunteer on AHA's Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh (Pa.
If there hadn't been bystander CPR then we wouldn't be here today seeing Mike as well as he is.
Expanding T-CPR training access is a proactive response to the American Heart Association's (AHA) recommended program for increasing cardiac arrest survival by improving bystander CPR rates.
The Toronto Paramedic Services' Safe City program promotes the importance of bystander CPR and AED use in the City of Toronto to save the lives of those who suffer a sudden cardiac arrest.
Event tree' analysis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest data: confirming the importance of bystander CPR.
Chances of survival for cardiac arrest patients are almost zero if they collapse and receive no bystander CPR until emergency services arrive.
More than 500 students from Year 8 will be taking part in the sessions which begin with a DVD showing a cardiac arrest scenario and the benefits of bystander CPR.
8) before cardiac arrest, location of cardiac arrest, bystander witnessed arrest, bystander CPR performed, first documented pulseless rhythm, time interval from collapse/arrival to start of CPR in minutes, CPR duration, time of arrest, initial cause of cardiac arrest and total ampoules of adrenalin used were recorded.
Patients with traumatic OHCA and those whose bystander CPR (BCPR) was provided by a health care professional weren't included.
According to the American Heart Association, when bystander CPR is provided immediately after Sudden Cardiac Arrest, the victim's chance of survival can double or triple.
Driven to find out why there was such a disparity, Sasson has spent the last decade uncovering what the public health community is discovering is a nationwide problem: bystander CPR happens less frequently in low-income and minority communities.