bystander


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bystander

One who stands nearby; generally understood to be a spectator of unfolding events—i.e., a nonparticipant.
References in periodicals archive ?
A leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra, Ugochukwu Chinweuba, gave a contradictory account, saying police opened fire and a bystander was killed.
Instances such as these raise several questions in the UAE: Can a bystander assist in times of an accident?
Specifically, we sought to determine whether men's and women's religiosity, Internet pornography use, and motivation to use pornography would predict their bystander efficacy and willingness to intervene in a potential rape situation.
Initial reports from the police say that three people in the bus were killed and one female bystander.
But bystander apathy is, in fact, a well-documented phenomenon whereby those witnessing a crime fail to help a victim.
Jason Carlyon, Resuscitation Manager for YAS, said: "If someone suffers a cardiac arrest, their chances of survival double if it happens in front of a bystander who immediately starts CPR before our arrival.
we believe providing this training to the lay bystander will (also benefit) other incidents resulting in injury and hemorrhage.
If a bystander provides CPR, the chance of a cardiac arrest victim surviving is increased by about 2-3 times.
One interesting approach is to get bystanders to be active monitors and reporters of harassment online or in person.
One bystander, who initially took the robber to the ground, suffered injuries to his hands and arms but did not require immediate medical attention, police said.
The Arab bystander kicked the woman several times, while punching the man several times in the face as people watched .
It was then that a bystander stepped in and shoved Estrada away, which allowed other nearby deputies to grab hold of him and detain him.