byssus

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byssus

the threads which attach certain molluscs to the SUBSTRATE (2) or the stalk in some fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although byssal thread attachment may contribute to handling costs of P.
3) Are there tradeoffs between growth in body mass and growth of byssal threads, the protein-rich extensions used to anchor individuals to the rock?
Instead, the mussel anchors itself to a firm surface with a group of filaments called byssal threads or byssus, also known as the "beard" that has to be yanked off the shell before you start cooking.
After 24 h, the settlement of mussels at various concentrations was recorded and minimum concentration which prevented byssal production and attachment was denoted as [EC.
Truncilla macrodon was located by observing tracks in the substrate, such that one individual, for example, was attached to a conglomeration of sand by byssal threads.
The lower valve on which the scallop rests on the bottom has a paler color, is more convex, and also differs from the upper in having a byssal notch.
Most mussels have what is commonly called "the beard," also known as byssal threads.
During seasonal sloughing of eelgrass blades, juvenile bay scallops break away and re-establish byssal attachments to seagrass blades (Thayer et al.
Five years later, and having figured out that mussels get their super grip by secreting proteins known as byssal threads, Li and his colleagues are on the forefront of the woodworking industry's latest adhesive alternative, which Li says would work especially well in plywood manufacturing.
Masses of kelp and epifaunal animals in windrows showed instances in which small-bodied individual Mytilus had fastened themselves to the bases of more massive, already attached Laminaria plants by byssal threads, and instances of the reverse, in which young individual Laminaria had anchored themselves by holdfast to valves of attached Mytilus.
The larvae readily attach to the byssal threads of juveniles and adults, but may also settle on bryozoans, hydroids, filiform algae, and other filamentous substrates (Lutz and Kennish, 1992).
It attaches itself to a rock with thin strands of "glue" called byssal (BISS-ul) threads.