by-product

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by-product

Chemical
A product of a chemical reaction or industrial process which differs from the desired product.

Radiation physics
A class of secondary radioactive material regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
References in periodicals archive ?
The byproduct of castor bean promoted the lowest cumulative gas production at the end of 48 incubation hours, because the high protein concentration of this byproduct acts in the formation of bicarbonate from C[O.
The use of foundry byproduct as low-hydraulic conductivity barrier construction eliminates the need and cost to import clay soil, maximizes airspace capacity and extends the working life of the landfill.
3]-N concentration from the black tea by-product than from the green tea by-product due to PEG addition indicate that tannins in black tea byproduct could suppress rumen fermentation more strongly than that in green tea by-product.
In addition, there are many instances, especially in plants that originated as and/or remain family-operated businesses, where long-standing relationships with local farmers determine byproduct handling.
There are also emotional predispositions that evolved for various reasons and make us prone to religious belief as a byproduct.
The advantages of the two "cost reduction" methods are that (1) they are theoretically sound because they give the primary product credit for the pieces of it that were sold off or will be sold off, and (2) they de-emphasize byproducts by having no byproduct revenue reflected on the income statement.
The larger hydrogen fuel cells have the additional advantage of producing pure drinking water as a byproduct, a significant consideration in village communities around the world where access to clean water is often a critical concern.
The disinfection and byproducts rule will take effect Jan.
The Global Waste Research Institute (GWRI), located in San Luis Obispo, California, is a collaborative effort between Cal Poly and industry to promote the development of sustainable waste and byproduct management technologies and advance current practices in resource management.
Samples of approximately 300 g of each byproduct resulting from the processing or extraction of vegetable oil were collected and sent to the Laboratory of Food Analysis, Embrapa Dairy Cattle, Juiz de Fora city, Minas Gerais State, for chemical analysis and analysis of gases.
In this regard, research for SF byproducts and increased availability by them has not been performed by fermentation.