buttonhole

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but·ton·hole

(bŭt'ŏn-hōl),
1. A short straight cut made through the wall of a cavity or canal.
2. The contraction of an orifice down to a narrow slit; that is, the so-called mitral buttonhole in extreme mitral stenosis.

buttonhole

Etymology: OFr, boton + AS, hol
a small slitlike hole in the wall of a structure or a cavity of the body.

but·ton·hole

(bŭt'ŏn-hōl)
1. A short straight cut made through the wall of a cavity or canal.
2. The contraction of an orifice down to a narrow slit; i.e., the so-called mitral buttonhole in extreme mitral stenosis.

buttonhole

(bŭt′ŏn-hōl″)
An incision (sometimes inadvertent) into the wall of a cavity or membrane. This term may be applied to surgical procedures on hollow organ systems such as the gastrointestinal, urinary tract, and cardiovascular systems and to some of myocutaneous grafts.
References in periodicals archive ?
The neckline is bound in a bias strip of linen, and 12 buttons and buttonholes are spaced evenly down the front edge (10 for flank companies).
Review the principles of Buttonhole (BH) cannulation of arteriovenous fistulas (AVF).
And the machine coped fine with heavy fabrics, (four-step) buttonholes and more.
The word: This was the German word for buttonhole 'Knopfloch', dreamed up by Bev.
To order your charity buttonhole telephone Tara on 0120 748 2020 or email info@theflowerroombirmingham.
Kitting out three bridemaids adds pounds 519 to the bill, plus pounds 20 for buttonholes for the groom, best man and close male relatives.
Members of the Welsh rugby teamwill wear them as buttonholes before the Wales v England game at the Millennium Stadium on March 17.
Even the napkins you will use at the dinner table can be part of the decorations; secure them to the outside back cover by two horizontal buttonholes through which a ribbon has been passed.
They talk in the gallery by the picture, and later Cruz buttonholes him in the museum cafe.
Push a pipecleaner up through one of the buttonholes.
Buttonholes, as the buds worn on a gentleman's left lapel are dubbed in England, bloom throughout the movie--a nod to Wilde's own penchant for petals, not to mention the writer's famed Green Carnation Club, which gave members a means of spotting their gay brethren.