butterfly weed


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Related to butterfly weed: Asclepias tuberosa

butterfly weed

n.
A North American milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) having showy clusters of usually bright orange flowers and a root that was formerly used in medicine. Also called pleurisy root.

pleurisy root

An herbal root which contains glycosides—e.g., asclepiadin, resins, volatile oil; it is antispasmodic, diaphoretic, expectorant, tonic, carminative and mildly cathartic, and has been used by herbalists for respiratory tract infections.
 
Toxicity
Fresh roots may cause vomiting and toxicity at high doses.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bloodfower, a taller, bicolor milkweed, is a wonderful addition to the butterfly garden and is often chosen over the Butterfly Weed as a host plant by Monarchs.
ATTRACT butterflies by planting things like buddlea, teasel, rosemary, butterfly weed, marigolds and snapdragon - kids will love squeezing the flower to make the "dragon's"mouth open.
Butterfly Weed ("Pleurisy Root") (Asclepias tuberosa)
As the entire family worked in the yard cutting back last year's growth, we noticed little caterpillars crawling on the Asclepias tuberosa - a k a butterfly weed.
More to try: autumn sage, butterfly weed, California poppy, catmint, English lavender, Gaura lindheimeri, and Mexican hat.
Queen Anne's lace and butterfly weed grow in soil which is unsuitable for many plants.
Not only does the book highlight recent additions to the Southern landscape such as bear's breeches, Japanese fiber banana, and angelonias, but new varieties of old favorites get renewed attention from Winter's text: bachelor buttons in three heights, a renewed popularity of butterfly weed, and a purple-leafed variety of elephant ears, well-known for their tolerance of sun and humidity.
Blue mist, sweet shrub, sweet spire, half-a-dozen species of local ferns, butterfly weed, and a number of other native plant species grace our flowerbeds with abundant green and vibrant color when in season.
Seeds of most hardy perennials--including bleeding heart, butterfly weed, columbine, delphinium, liatris, and penstemon--require a period of chilling to germinate.