butterfat


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

butterfat

(bŭt′ər-făt′)
n.
The natural fat of milk from which butter is made, consisting largely of the glycerides of oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids. Also called milk fat.

butterfat

globules in the milk of all species. It can be separated to make butter. The nutritional value and the price of milk are judged on, among other things, the butterfat content of the milk. A dramatic drop in the content in milk of butterfat may be caused by a too low fiber content of the diet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incorporating feed such as Butterfat Extra Flakes into a buffer ration can typically result in a rise of butterfat of up to 0.
Their milk is richer than that of Holsteins but not as high in butterfat as Jerseys or Guernseys.
Wheat spawn grain interacted with the various oils to induce mean stipe diameters in the order of cotton or coconut, groundnut, butterfat, palm or palm kernel oil.
The PAL-1 digital refractometer gives a clear indication of the butterfat content in a quick, simple, unambiguous way.
Butter comes from little droplets of fat called butterfat, which are a natural part of cream.
All are made without the dairy derivatives lactose, butterfat, milk, whey and casein.
They fed other rats a diet augmented with the same amount of butterfat but containing the usual proportion of CLA.
The measurement of fecal fat excretion (1) remains an important test in the diagnosis of fat malabsorption despite the development of alternative biochemical investigations, such as the butterfat test (2), steatocrit (3), and triolein breath tests (4), and alternative diagnostic strategies in gastroenterology.
A nationwide shortage of butterfat, the main ingredient in chocolate, pastries and other rich foods has food makers struggling with record prices for butter, ice cream and cheese.
The time-honored appeal of ice cream, besides its cooling effect, is its "feel"--the smooth, creamy taste sensation that its high butterfat content provides (as much as 20 percent butterfat in some of the highly touted, high-priced brands).
Roquefort is the boldest; creamier blue cheeses include blue castello, sweet gorgonzola or regular gorgonzola (sharper flavor), and saga blue and cambozola (both have enough butterfat to fit the next category).
These fats are used as substitutes for butterfat and cocoa butter, as transfree solutions for fillings for chocolate and confectionery products, and in the cosmetics industry.