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bur

 [ber]
a form of drill used for creating openings in bone or similar hard material. Also spelled burr.
Bur. From Dorland's, 2000.

bur

(ber), This spelling is preferred to burr.
1. A rotary cutting instrument.
2. In ophthalmology, a device used to remove rust rings embedded in the cornea.
Synonym(s): burr

burr

(bur) bur.

burr

a rotary instrument fitted into a handpiece and used to cut teeth or bone. Also spelled bur.

burr

A drill bit used to cut hard tissues (e.g., enamel, bone) in dentistry or orthopaedics.

burr

A drill bit used to cut hard tissues–enamel, bone in dentistry or orthopaedics

bur

(bŭr)
A rotary cutting instrument, used in dentistry, consisting of a small metal shaft and a head designed in various shapes; used at various rotational velocities to excavate decay, shape cavity forms, and reduce tooth structure.

burr

a drill bit/rotary cutting instrument used to reduce nail plate thickness or callosity

burr

1. a plant seed capsule carrying many hooked structures which catch in animal coats thus promoting dissemination of the plant. The word is also used as a collective name for plants that carry burrs, e.g. Noogoora burr, Buffalo burr, burr medic, burr trefoil.
2. a surgical instrument. See bur.
3. the irregular cartilage formation seen inside a dog's ear.

burr buttercup
ranunculustesticulatus.
burr tongue
physical injury to tongue by foreign bodies especially plant awns and burrs.
References in periodicals archive ?
While Burr and Crandall are still working out the particulars of their pricing, a trip on Pogo will certainly cost more than a first-class ticket on a commercial carrier.
Burr and Crandall intend to start small, initially operating only within a 500-mile radius of New York City.
Burr and Crandall aren't the only people thinking about creating an air taxi service, but they're easily the most credentialed.
Shortly afterwards, Burr noticed a comment Crandall had made to an aerospace trade publication, extolling the prospects for air taxis, and contacted him about teaming up.
while Burr, the CEO, is ensconced at company headquarters in Stratford, Conn.
Between 1981 and 1984, Burr built People Express from scratch into the nation's fifth-largest air carrier, with 4,000 employees and serving 100 cities, including a few overseas destinations.
Burr is the entrepreneur, while Crandall brings the experience of running a large legacy carrier.
But Burr had one idea firmly in mind: He did not want to be a Lorenzo-style manager.
It seems a safe assumption that Crandall will cede the touchy-feely employee and customer stuff to Burr.
Burr and Crandall are confident they can assemble just such a system, thanks in part to a recent hire: Jeff Cohen, former chief information officer of JetBlue.