burrow

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bur·row

(ber'ō),
1. A subcutaneous tunnel or tract made by a parasite (for example, scabies mite).
2. A sinus or fistula.
3. (Rare) To undermine or create a tunnel or tract through or beneath various tissue planes.

burrow

(bur'ro)
A tunnel made in or under the skin (e.g., by an insect or a parasite).
See: cutaneous larva migrans; scabies
References in periodicals archive ?
genlryi is a primary burrower and a known inhabitant of the Highland Rim province.
Side muscle scars connect median muscle scars and they are in a similar position as accessory muscle scars in some Ordovician bivalves considered as infaunal burrowers (Babinka, Coxiconchia or Praenucula) (Fig.
A case in point is fabulous new BBC Two series The Burrowers.
Whether they may try waiting it out until the previous interest rates return or to lock in their rates to avoid inflating interest rates, loan burrowers remain unclear on the best course of action.
darts The new series marks the start of the BBC's Summer of Wildlife, which will include a new daytime series, Springwatch In The Afternoon, presented by Nick Baker; Britain's Big Wildlife Revival, presented by Countryfile's Ellie Harrison, plus as a mini-series, The Burrowers, presented by Packham, about the lives of badgers, moles and rabbits.
However, burrowers such as nematodes and some copepods are thought to have entered artificial depressions via crawling or passively through disturbance-induced suspension in the intertidal and in shallow embayments (35, 36).
Spiders from Monahans Sandhills State Park in Texas were described as being obligate burrowers and showing distress when access to the burrow was blocked (Jack Brookhart pers.
year-old sketch, in which Jasper tells how he once tried to rid his garden of the furry little burrowers.
The proposed ecosystem would have been inhabited by deposit-feeding epibenthos (producing Rusophycus and rare Cruziana) and interface burrowers (Helminthopsis); plug-shaped burrows in TF25b are likely a preservational variant of Rusophycus.
The legless glass lizards are good burrowers and usually occur where there is loose or sandy soil.
Farmers have traditionally regarded earthworms as their friends because these burrowers aerate soil and can speed the release of nutrients as they eat fallen leaves.