burrow

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bur·row

(ber'ō),
1. A subcutaneous tunnel or tract made by a parasite (for example, scabies mite).
2. A sinus or fistula.
3. (Rare) To undermine or create a tunnel or tract through or beneath various tissue planes.

burrow

(bur'ro)
A tunnel made in or under the skin (e.g., by an insect or a parasite).
See: cutaneous larva migrans; scabies
References in periodicals archive ?
Data analysis: Scarabaeinae community structure was analyzed using the criteria of Halffter and Favila (1993) and Favila and Halffter (1997): segregation by feeding habits (strict coprophages, strict necrophages and generalists); food relocation (percentage of burrowers and rollers); spatial segregation (percentage of umbrophiles and heliophiles); temporal segregation (percentage diurnal and nocturnal); and size segregation (small -- 3 to 8 mm, medium -- 9 to 14 mm, large -- 15+mm).
Although the Pacific sand lance does have an elongate body, a small cross section, and fins that lie flat, it otherwise has little in common with typical burrowers.
genlryi is a primary burrower and a known inhabitant of the Highland Rim province.
The ones that do include fanciful names such as Cajun dwarf crayfish (Cambarellus shufeldtii), phantom cave crayfish (Procambarus pecki), bottlebrush crayfish (Barbicambarus cornutus), devil crawfish (Cambarus diogenes), ditch fencing crayfish (Faxonella clypeata), Piedmont blue burrower (Cambarus harti), and even the rusty grave digger (Cambarus miltus).
Because Yoldia limatula is a relatively shallow burrower, most of the differences are expected to be in the top layer of sediment.
This nocturnal solitary insectivore is more nomadic than most hedgehogs of the same genus and does not seem to be a very active burrower.
To take up this challenge is to make the mind a burrower.
Nester or burrower (nesting in burrows): (0) nest, (1) burrow, (2) either.
My little Yorkie Luka loves this bed; he has always been a burrower so it was a perfect fit.
This large clam is considered a fast burrower, which lives buried in the sediment, migrating seasonally into the intertidal zone.
araucanius would be a primary burrower, since it builds complex burrows are not connected to permanent water bodies, and the entire life cycle of this species occurs inside the burrows.