burnout


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to burnout: Maslach Burnout Inventory

burnout

 [bern´out]
emotional and physical exhaustion resulting from a combination of exposure to environmental and internal stressors and inadequate coping and adaptive skills. In addition to signs of exhaustion, the person with burnout exhibits an increasingly negative attitude toward his or her job, low self-esteem, and personal devaluation.

Strategies for preventing and managing burnout include utilizing assertiveness techniques, improving problem-solving and decision-making skills, clarifying personal values and setting realistic personal goals, learning and using coping mechanisms to deal with emotions, ensuring oneself adequate relaxation and recreation, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and minimizing stressors at work and at home.

burn·out

(bern'owt),
1. In dentistry, the elimination, by heat, of an invested pattern from a set investment to prepare the mold to receive casting metal.
2. A psychological state of physical and emotional exhaustion thought to be a stress reaction to a reduced ability to meet the demands of one's occupation; symptoms include fatigue, insomnia, impaired work performance, and an increased suscepibility to physical illness and substance abuse.

burnout

a popular term for a mental or physical energy depletion after a period of chronic, unrelieved job-related stress characterized sometimes by physical illness. The person suffering from burnout may lose concern or respect for other people and often has cynical, dehumanized perceptions of people, labeling them in a derogatory manner. Causes of burnout peculiar to the nursing profession often include stressful, even dangerous, work environments; lack of support; lack of respectful relationships within the health care team; low pay scales compared with physicians' salaries; shift changes and long work hours; understaffing of hospitals; pressure from the responsibility of providing continuous high levels of care over long periods; and frustration and disillusionment resulting from the difference between job realities and job expectations.
Dentistry A method of preparing a mould to receive casting metal
Drug slang A regional term for (1) A heavy abuser of drugs (2) Heavy abuse of drugs per se
Gynecology See Cervical burnout
Materials science A ‘stress’ pattern seen in solid materials when subjected to red heat
Psychiatry A stress reaction developed by persons working in an area of unrelenting occupational stress, resulting in decreased work performance, fatigue, insomnia, depression, increased susceptibility to physical illness, and alcohol or drug abuse for temporary relief
Radiation biology Rapid decrease in neutral particle density in a plasma discharge, which occurs when the ionization rate—which converts neutrals to ions and electrons—exceeds the rate of recombination, neutralising ion, and the rate of influx of neutral particles
Social medicine Compassion fatigue A feeling of hopeless frustration often accompanied by depression, experienced by workers in certain fields; in the health care field, without an active, self-renewing support group, nurses, and social workers assigned to AIDS units, oncology, and geriatrics—in which one encounters a high volume of dementia, deterioration, and death—drift toward callousness and desire to change fields
Sports medicine The state of boredom with exercise often related to overtraining
Management Rest, cross-training

burnout

Drug slang
1. A heavy abuser of drugs.
2. Street argot for heavy abuse of drugs Gynecology See Cervical burnout Psychiatry A stress reaction developing in persons working in an area of unrelenting occupational demands Clinical ↓ work performance, fatigue, insomnia, depression, ↑ susceptibility to physical illness, reliance on alcohol or other drugs of abuse for temporary relief. See Flight-or-fight response, Old Soldier syndrome. Cf Adaptation response, Alarm stage.

o·ver·train·ing syn·drome

(ō'vĕr-trān'ing sin'drōm)
A group of symptoms resulting from excessive physical training; includes fatigue, poor exercise performance, frequent upper-respiratory tract infections, altered mood, general malaise, weight loss, muscle stiffness and soreness, and loss of interest in high-level training.
Synonym(s): burnout, staleness.

Burnout

An emotional condition marked by tiredness, loss of interest, or frustration that interferes with job performance. Burnout is usually regarded as the result of prolonged stress.
Mentioned in: Stress Reduction

burnout

a syndrome induced by chronic exposure to stressors associated with an activity in which the individual regularly engages. Characterized by physical and emotional exhaustion, anxiety, depression and impaired performance. May be related to work or, in the context of sport, to prolonged, intensive training or overfrequent competition. See also overtraining.

burnout,

n 1. a state that occurs when energy is used up faster than it is restored.
2. psychological and physical fatigue of a caregiver resulting in apathy and depression.

burn·out

(bŭrn'owt)
In dentistry, the elimination, by heat, of an invested pattern from a set investment to prepare the mold to receive casting metal.

burnout,

n the elimination by heat of an invested pattern from a set investment to prepare the mold to receive casting metal.
burnout, high heat,
n the use of temperatures higher than 1100° F (593.5° C) to effect wax elimination and prepare the mold to receive casting metal.
burnout, inlay (wax),
n the elimination of wax from an invested inlay flask. See also wax elimination.
burnout, job,
n the condition of having no energy left to care, resulting from chronic, unrelieved job-related stress and characterized by physical and emotional exhaustion and sometimes by physical illness.
burnout, radiographic,
n the excessive penetration of the radiographic beam of an object or part of an object, producing a totally black, or overexposed, area on the radiograph.
burnout, wax,
n See burnout, inlay and wax elimination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Observed supervisory behavior and teacher burnout in special education.
Commitment to classroom model philosophy and burnout symptoms among high fidelity teachers implementing preschool programs for children with autism spectrum disorders.
This model conceptualizes a dynamic relationship between individuals and their environment; work stress and its potential results of compassion fatigue and burnout occur when individuals see the environment as taxing or exceeding their personal coping resources.
Although researchers examining counselor compassion fatigue and burnout have not typically employed this model, the transactional model (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984) best represents current understandings of the stress process.
Not only are physician dissatisfaction and burnout increasing, but they are likely to be exacerbated by several factors on the health care horizon.
Dissatisfaction and burnout among physicians--or the converse, physician well-being--affect patient care in a number of direct and indirect ways.
Considering the subject literature about job burnout and its causes and the ways to confront with this phenomenon, the present research is going to identify the effect of job burnout on managers' effectiveness in organizations.
It is expected that the relationship between Emotional Intelligence and each of the components of Job Burnout will be negative.
The high burnout group will claim more for medicinal purchases than the low burnout group.
Since substance abuse treatment counselor burnout has the potential to negatively impact client treatment outcomes and the employing treatment organization, it is important to develop a greater understanding of burnout for substance abuse counselors and any variations that may occur by geographic locale.
Given the current state of employee engagement in Germany, it's evident that most managers aren't creating environments in which employees feel motivated, which is contributing to employee burnout.
This study aims to assess the effectiveness of Logotherapy on reduction of burnout in mothers with children suffering from attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.