burial form

burial form

An official form issued by a coroner in the UK to authorise burial of the body of a decedent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eisenschmidt discusses several other issues, such as burial form, grave orientation, grave marking, cemetery structure and grave goods, in terms of religious change (Chapter 6.
Equally fascinating in this volume is chapter five where Rowe examines a more radical alternative to traditional graves by discussing the new burial form of scattering ashes.
Mark Rowe's account of how traditional burial forms are being transformed in Japan provides an excellent lens through which to view the state of contemporary Japanese Buddhism.
Thus, despite the demographic pressures that have pushed traditional burial forms to their limit, Rowe argues that these new grave sites provide a new form of community.
Although novel burial forms have been duly noted in the Japanese press, Rowe's key contribution in this first full-length study of eternal memorial graves is in looking beneath the rise of such novel burial forms to observe that despite significant departures in external appearance, the bonds which drive the demand for a certain kind of burial and even the ritual form, for now, have not changed (75).
The burial form of these tombs primarily fell under the unique burial customs of the Qin people with the skeletons of the dead maintaining the fetal position.
how do these relate to burial form and what is their relationship to evidence of occupation?
The majority of his songs are about death of some kind, so it'll come as no surprise to learn the New Englander spends his days filling out burial forms on behalf of a Jewish cemetery organisation.
The substantive detail of these chapters (which include papers on the 'mausoleum culture' of Africa Proconsularis, the transition from cremation to inhumation in Roman North Africa, and changes in urban burial forms into the Byzantine era), is thus more likely to be of interest to scholars who work on rather similar topics elsewhere in the Mediterranean basin rather than those who work elsewhere on the African continent.
There is some settlement evidence for the Andronovo and the Karasuk periods, but the main focus of study has been on burial forms and practices.
So we run through an exhaustive list of types of swords, spearheads, arrowheads, daggers and other objects; and then a list of burial forms (in which cremation dominates since most of the graves belong to the Urnfield period).
I found it highly interesting to see the links between the late Saxon and Scandinavian-style burial forms and those of the later Middle Ages.