burden

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burden

 [ber´den]
body burden chemicals stored in the body that may be detected by analysis.

bod·y bur·den

(bod'ē bĕr'den),
Activity of a radiopharmaceutical retained by the body at a specified time following administration.

burden

1 load.
2 a heavy, oppressive load, as a disabling clinical load.
References in periodicals archive ?
Requiring the FDA to disclose how it considered and applied the least burdensome requirements in its rationale for significant decisions.
Surprisingly, the graph related to company size shows a U-shaped pattern, with the largest share of companies reporting burdensome NTMs among both the smallest companies, with fewer than 11 employees, and the biggest ones, with more than 250 employees.
The authors said that financial incentives probably underlie many of the burdensome transitions.
When relevant information would be unduly burdensome to produce, as suggested by Category 3, courts will often tailor a discovery order to minimize the burden on the producing party.
A simplified, less burdensome approach to the diagnosis of diabetes and pre-diabetes would facilitate increased recognition and improved care of these conditions.
If on the one hand as a church we celebrate that Christ has risen from the dead, and on the other hand we are maintaining an ongoing, aggressive, burdensome therapy in a person who is clearly dying naturally, that doesn't make sense.
A chain of interactions between neighboring qubits would be required to connect distant qubits, which would be a burdensome communication cost.
Management burden--Managing software and large numbers of tapes is burdensome and highly error prone.
However, the Institute expressed its concern to the Senate Finance Committee that the bill would overreach its target, resulting in a statute so broad, vague and punitive it would have a burdensome effect on normal transactions.
Observers say the meeting produced lots of complaints about the potentially burdensome costs of testing, sampling, and record keeping by industry groups.
Distinguishing this particular case from the wider debate on euthanasia and pointing out that the principle involved was quite different, Archbishop Mario Conti of Glasgow said that Miss B's request was not for assisted suicide but rather for the discontinuation of a medical procedure that had become burdensome.