bunyip


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bunyip

A creature that is an integral part of the Australian aboriginal mythology, which translates loosely as devil or evil spirit. The bunyip is said to live in swamps and waterholes in southeastern Australia; recorded descriptions—canine facies, dark fur, flippers, tail and tusks—overlap those of marine seals and sea lions which occasionally wander inland. There are neither credible photos nor dissected skeletons of the bunyip.

bunyip

a mythical animal denizen of Australian swamps. Its ogreish reputation makes it a threatening figure to children.
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Can Emily and her friends possibly make the Bunyip smile this Yuletide?
45 In which country was the thankfully mythical bunyip once feared?
In Victoria, it was a waterhole and a bunyip (Dawson 1981:99); at Oenpelli, a great plum tree; and on Groote Eylandt, the final resting place of the spirit of the rock-cod (Mountford 1956:487).
Prior to joining VeriSign, Daigle was executive vice president at Rattlenote Technology, a consultant at Thinking Cat Enterprises and a vice president of research at Bunyip Information Systems.
To find out, Lainie Berry conducted a study comparing the influence of habitat edges created due to human activity, or `edge effects' on the distribution and abundance of birds at Bunyip State Park, Victoria.
PHOTO : Aborigine stories of the bunyip, a man-eating monster, may have been inspired in part by
Bunyip Tours has a three-hour Neighbours trip for PS33pp that heads straight to Ramsay Street, allowing me to snoop into the gardens of No 22 (the Robinson's household), No 24 (Lou Carpenter's abode), No 28 (Susan and Karl Kennedy's house) and No 30 (Toadie Rebecchi's pad).
A mean and grumpy Bunyip becomes friendly--even Generous--when she helps the bilbies open their pots of colour.
From The Bunyip of Berkeley's Creek on, he says, he only 'agreed to illustrate texts I loved' (p.
BLAZE: A fire truck moves away from out-of-control flames from a bushfire in the Bunyip Sate Forest west of Melbourne
There was a tradition on this part of the river that a bunyip had once come ashore there--something like a calf with whiskers.
Here we learn that wowseristic Uncle Wattleberry's whiskers are the principal reasons for Bunyip Bluegum to leave home and travel the world, Norman Lindsay, The Magic Pudding, Sydney, 1918, pp.