bully


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bully

A person who uses physical or psychological means or force to get his or her way, esp. by intimidating or hurting others who may be smaller or weaker.
References in periodicals archive ?
Minister for Education Martin Dixon announced the funding at the 2014 Bully Zero Charity Ball fundraiser at Etihad Stadium last night.
Ohanian gained enormous insight from his experience and in Chestnuts he offers keen insight not only into children who have been bullied but also those who bully others.
The red flags that parents should look out for if they suspect that their child is a bully includes: lose of temper easily, getting into fights at home, damaging property, needing to dominate others and showing little sympathy to others who are being bullied.
In the 50-page Manny McMoose book, which McMahon self-published three years ago and reissued in September with full-color illustrations, the overweight hero with a chubby posterior gets teased by a bully to the point of depression.
If you can, tell the bully that their behaviour is unreasonable and inappropriate, and that you want it to stop.
And for all concerned, whether victim, bully, or both, the consequences can be many and long-lasting.
Since it was launched in 2004 the ECHO-backed charity estimates it has helped more than 100,000 Merseyside bully victims and their families as well as showing would-be bullies the harm teasing and verbal and physical abuse can have.
Taking a Karate "stance" or pose to show the bully you are strong and you know how to defend yourself.
Many are concerned about the impact that bullying has on the mental health of the victim, yet the act of bullying is often a sign that the bully also may have mental health issues.
Nearly 29% of teachers feel restorative justice, when the bully has to face the victim and hear how they were made to feel, is the most effective anti-bullying measure.