bully


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bully

A person who uses physical or psychological means or force to get his or her way, esp. by intimidating or hurting others who may be smaller or weaker.
References in periodicals archive ?
The issue, another academician Nosheen Rauf advised, should be handled subtly,involving both the bully and the bullied children.
Sometimes they feel they are somehow to blame or feel scared that if the bully finds out that they told, it will get worse.
Strange though it may sound, it is in these moments that a true bully - someone who lives under the misapprehension that they need to have power over their target - will often desist when handled effectively by someone who knows how to defend themselves.
Oftentimes, the bully retaliates after being confronted by the bullied child's parent.
In The Bully Book, Eric Haskins has never had a problem with bullying until he enters sixth grade and the class bully, Jason "Crazypants," and his supporters decide to make Eric the "Grunt.
This person has no interest in inflaming others and often will neither confront the bully nor report him or her.
However, boys tended to cyber bully more than girls, girls were more often victims of email bullying than boys, and boys were more likely to bully via text message than girls.
Recording incidents of bullying in a diary can be helpful if you decide to pursue further action against the bully.
Ohanian gained enormous insight from his experience and in Chestnuts he offers keen insight not only into children who have been bullied but also those who bully others.
The red flags that parents should look out for if they suspect that their child is a bully includes: lose of temper easily, getting into fights at home, damaging property, needing to dominate others and showing little sympathy to others who are being bullied.