bulls-eye lesion

bulls-eye lesion

Dermatology The morphology of erythema multiforme, which is mediated by circulating immune complexes, elicited by infections, drugs, connective tissue disease; the skin may also have erythematous plaques and vesiculobullous lesions; BELs are also a classic lesion of Lyme disease seen 1-3 wks before the onset of the arthritic symptoms; mucosal involvement has been designated as Stevens-Johnson syndrome Endoscopy A finding in the GI lumen, in which edematous folds surround a central depression–mass lesion with a central ulcer, non-specific finding seen in solitary amebomas, actinomycosis, amyloidosis, appendiceal disease, TB; single BELs include submucosal carcinoid, primary carcinoma, KS, leiomyoma, leiomyosarcoma, lipoma, and lymphoma; multiple BELs occur in metastases from primary breast, lung, and renal carcinoma, lymphoma, and mastocytosis GI radiology BELs are similar to those seen by endoscopy, are caused by centrally ulcerated lesions, suggestive of malignancy, where the central zone is hypodense, ie necrotic, implying a rapidly proliferating lesion that has outgrown its vascular supply; multifocal BELs are suggestive of melanoma; unifocal BELs occur in carcinoma metastatic to the GI tract, benign or malignant smooth muscle tumors of the intestinal wall, KS and other sarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, ectopic pancreatic tissue.
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Only 10% of the patients with early Lyme disease show the classic bulls-eye lesion with concentric erythematous rings and central clearing.